Curriculum

Curriculum

The New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine is guided by its mission to train outstanding physicians in a continuum of medical education that encompasses pre-clinical education, clinical clerkships, and graduate medical education.

Due to our ongoing efforts at curricular development, we proudly offer students a choice of two curricular options:

• An innovative Lecture-Discussion Based (LDB) track that integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences along continuous didactic ‘threads’ delivered according to a systems based approach.

• A problem-based curriculum, the Doctor Patient Continuum (DPC), whose cornerstone is small-group, case-based learning.

Our curriculum developers examine course content and pedagogy on an ongoing basis and make enhancements each year. We broadly encourage and solicit student feedback on course content and delivery. Through our innovative Course-Faculty Assessment (CFA) program, student voices are heard, and student suggestions have led to significant improvements in courses. A student-centered, patient-focused approach is utilized to correlate basic and clinical science subject matter in an integrated fashion during the first two years of the continuum. Computer-assisted instruction includes a state-of-the art patient simulation facility. Both curricular tracks, LDB and DPC, feature small group instruction in basic and clinical science labs, including practical components of the doctor-patient relationship and osteopathic manipulative medicine. Clerkships in the third and fourth years of the continuum provide for a variety of clinical exposures and experiences, from one-on-one preceptorships in physicians’ private practices, to serving as members of interprofessional teams in tertiary care hospitals. As their skills develop, our students take on increasing responsibility and take part in advanced medical procedures.

Throughout the educational continuum, we encourage the integration of structural evaluations, osteopathic manipulative treatment, and a deep awareness of psychosocial factors, legal issues, and ethical concerns.

Course Descriptions

PRE-CLINICAL CURRICULUM: TWO TRACKS
NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine offers incoming students a choice of two curricular options: (1) an innovative Lecture-Discussion Based (LDB) track that integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences along continuous didactic ‘threads’ delivered according to a systems based approach, and (2) a problem-based curriculum, the Doctor Patient Continuum (DPC), whose cornerstone is small-group, case-based learning. The two curricular tracks share several key features that are critical to preparing students for a career in osteopathic medicine. During the first two years, all students in both tracks take a foundational course – Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine-that addresses the fundamentals of a variety of basic science and medical topics. All students also participate in laboratory sessions in osteopathic manipulative medicine, anatomy, and neuroanatomy. Sessions to develop the social and professional aspects of the Doctor-Patient Relationship (DPR) are required. In the third and fourth years, required and elective clinical rotations are the same for students in both tracks. The major difference between the two curricular tracks lies in how (and by whom) learning objectives are defined. In the LDB track, faculty direct the learning activities, which include scheduled, large-group, in-class sessions, as well as out-of-class assignments and virtual learning sessions. Courses are structured according to a defined syllabus, which includes a list of faculty-defined objectives. In the DPC track, students study individual case presentations in small groups and identify their own learning issues as new information comes to light in the case.

Lecture-Discussion Based (LDB) Track
CURRICULAR OVERVIEW AND THREAD DESCRIPTIONS

Courses in the first half of this four-year curricular continuum are organized in a systems-based format. The systems are preceded by the foundational course Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine. Each subsequent course addresses a single body system, including the Musculoskeletal, Integumentary, Nervous, Immunological, Respiratory, Cardiovascular, Endocrine, Gastrointestinal, Genitourinary, and Reproductive systems. Each course is composed of three “threads” that transcend the individual systems, and provide a longitudinal perspective on three major divisions of medical knowledge:

1) The Cellular and Molecular Basis of Medicine, covering essential basics in biochemistry, genetics, histology, microbiology, pathology, pharmacology and physiology

2) The Structural and Functional Basis of Medicine, offering an overview of how Anatomy and Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine are an organic foundation of Osteopathic Medicine and how their study should be approached

3) The Practice of Medicine, offering an analysis of the broad context in which medicine is practiced and initiating the training in clinical examination, communication and other skills

Our innovative approach addresses traditional organ systems and utilizes conceptual threads, allowing for integration between the bio-psycho-social and clinical sciences in a student-centered and patient-focused curriculum.

This innovative organ system approach allows for integration between the bio-psycho-social and clinical sciences in a student-centered/patient-focused curricular approach.

The Cellular and Molecular Basis of Medicine addresses the scientific principles specific to each organ system as it relates to the study of wellness and disease processes. The systems-specific content builds on general basic science foundations addressed in the Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine course. This thread is comprised of content material from the following disciplines: biochemistry, genetics, histology, microbiology, neuroscience, pathology, pharmacology, and physiology.

The Structural and Functional Basis of Medicine addresses the unique interrelationship between structure and function in wellness and disease, incorporating extensive didactic and laboratory experiences in applied anatomy and osteopathic principles and practices. This thread utilizes a systems-specific approach to the integrated study of human anatomy and osteopathic manipulative medicine, and builds on underlying fo undations presented in the introductory course.

The Practice of Medicine is a systems-based introduction to the essentials of clinical medicine. It presents the principles and practices of patient-centered health care delivery, with an emphasis on primary care in the pediatric, adult, and geriatric patient populations. It includes didactic and practical experiences in the doctor- patient relationship, as well as simulated and virtual clinical exercises utilizing standardized patients and human patient simulators. These experiences allow for the acquisition of behavioral and social skills, as well as the development of clinical skills in osteopathic diagnosis and treatment, including physical examination, medical interviewing, and record keeping.

YEAR ONE

Course/Seminar # of Credits
LDB 500 Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine
8.5
LDB 502 Hematological/Immunological System
7.0
LDB 503 Integumentary System
4.5
LDB 505 Musculoskeletal System
6.5
LDB 506 Nervous System and Behavior
15.0
BLS 501 Basic Life Support Seminar
0.0
CCC 500 Core Clinical Competencies Seminar I
0.0

YEAR TWO

Course/Seminar # of Credits
LDB 601 Cardiovascular System
8.0
LDB 602 Respiratory System
8.0
LDB 603 Gastrointestinal System
7.5
LDB 604 Genitourinary System
5.0
LDB 605 Reproductive System
5.0
LDB 606 Endocrine System
5.0
SEM 601 Child Abuse Seminar
0.0
SEM 603 Infection Control Seminar
0.0
SEM 605 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Seminar (HIPAA)
0.0
CCC 600 Core Clinical Competencies Seminar II
0.0

 

Doctor Patient Continuum (DPC) Track

[Note: Enrollment in the DPC curriculum is limited to approximately 40 students from each year’s entering class. Following acceptance to College of Osteopathic Medicine through the regular admissions process, students are afforded the opportunity to file a secondary application for admission to the DPC program.]

The Doctor Patient Continuum (DPC) is a hybrid problem-based curriculum founded on “continuum” education principles. Throughout the curriculum, learning activities are clustered within the context of clinical-case scenarios, serving as an interface between the patient and the physician, where the acquired knowledge, attitudes, and skills of the practicing clinician will later be applied. Curricular content is rooted in the scientific underpinnings of modern evidence-based medicine. The developing student-doctors are expected to explore aspects of health and disease pertinent to the clinical case at seven levels, including: molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, integrated organ system, whole person, and family, society and environment. At the same time, clinical relevance is stressed by highlighting the nexus between the “science” and its “application”. The curriculum is designed and implemented so as to achieve consistency among curricular goals, content, learning activities, and student evaluation. Beginning on the first day of medical school, and continuing throughout the four years of undergraduate medical education, learning activities are organized according to a continuous, iterative building process. The goal is not only for each student to achieve his/her full potential as a well-trained, highly competent graduating osteopathic physician; but also to provide a framework for continuing education through postgraduate training and into clinical practice. The DPC curriculum is highly student-centered, featuring “student learners” vs. “faculty teachers,” and promotes the development of critical thinking and clinical problem-solving skills.

Coursework in the DPC curriculum during years one and two includes: Courses in the first half of this four-year curricular continuum are preceded by the foundational course Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine. During this foundational course, students enrolled in the DPC curriculum are introduced to the small-group case-based learning process. Subsequent courses for the DPC curriculum include:

■ A series of courses in Biopsychosocial Sciences, including small-group case-based learning, anatomy/ microanatomy, and large-group faculty directed ‘problem sets’ and resource hours;

■ A series of courses in Clinical Sciences, including didactic and laboratory experiences in osteopathic manipulative medicine and in physical diagnosis. The fundamentals of the doctor-patient relationship are addressed through involvement with community-based physician mentors (Clinical Practicum), as well as experiences with standardized and simulated patients in the Institute for Clinical Competence.

DPC FIRST AND SECOND YEAR COURSEWORK
Doctor Patient Continuum Track

YEAR ONE

Course/Seminar                                                                                                                                                 # of Credits

DPC 500

DPC Introduction to Osteopathic Medicine

8.5

DPC 502

Biopsychosocial Sciences I

12.0

DPC 503

Clinical Sciences I

4.0

DPC 504

Biopsychosocial Sciences II

12.0

DPC 505

Clinical Sciences II

4.0

BLS 501

Basic Life Support

0.0

SEM 603

Infection Control Seminar

0.0

SEM 605

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

Seminar (HIPAA)

0.0

CCC 500

Core Clinical Competencies Seminar I

0.0

YEAR TWO

Course/Seminar                                                                                                                                       # of Credits

DPC 602

Biopsychosocial Sciences III

14.0

DPC 603

Clinical Sciences III

6.0

DPC 604

Biopsychosocial Sciences IV

14.0

DPC 605

Clinical Sciences IV

6.0

SEM 601

Child Abuse Seminar

0.0

LANG 601

Medical Spanish (Elective Course)

1.0

CCC 600

Core Clinical Competencies Seminar II

0.0


Contact Us

Old Westbury
Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000, Old Westbury, NY 11568
516.686.3747 | Email | Map

Academic Health Care Center
Northern Boulevard, P.O. Box 8000,  Old Westbury, NY 11568
516.686.1300 | Email | Map

Family Health Care Center
267 Carleton Ave., Central Islip, NY
631.348.3254 | Email | Map