Student Handbook: Global Edition

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Mission and History

Notice of NYIT Policies and Procedures: Policies and procedures in this catalog are binding for every student. NYIT reserves the right to change its policies and procedures, class schedules, and academic requirements at any time.

Like other institutions of higher learning, New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) aspires to excel in teaching, research, and service. What makes NYIT distinctive is its mission to provide:

1.1 CAREER-ORIENTED, PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

NYIT respects its students’ career concerns and schedules students to begin career-related courses in their first year. The college is guided by the belief that supporting career interests early in students’ education can help them develop a full range of capabilities and viewpoints. Because today’s students are likely to change jobs frequently throughout their working years, NYIT aspires to provide its students with lifelong learning competencies. The core curriculum, which is liberal arts-based and interdisciplinary in nature, is structured to help students to improve written and oral communication skills, and mathematical reasoning as well as develop the most up-to- date technological literacy throughout their college experience.

1.2 ACCESS TO OPPORTUNITY TO ALL QUALIFIED STUDENTS

NYIT makes higher education possible for those who otherwise might not have the opportunity. This commitment involves providing academic offerings that take varying abilities into account and providing a highly supportive student environment. Access also involves providing success opportunities for a diverse population of students & ndash;different ages, nationalities, ethnicities and socioeconomic backgrounds. Classes are offered days, evenings, and weekends, and students take classes at three New York locations—two on Long Island and one in Manhattan—as well as online via the Internet and at several global campuses: Abu Dhabi, Nanjing and Vancouver. All campus personnel—including the student affairs staff—are dedicated to student service and to motivating and stimulating students to achieve the college’s and the students’ own professional and personal goals.

1.3 APPLICATIONS-ORIENTED RESEARCH THAT BENEFITS THE LARGER WORLD

NYIT is committed to undertaking research and professional projects with practical applications that benefit the community and larger world. Its renowned faculty—who are academic experts and respected professionals in their fields—aim for goals and outcomes that can be applied toward solutions to real-world issues.

1.4 BRIEF HISTORY

New York Institute of Technology is an independent, comprehensive college offering undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees. Approximately 13,000 students take courses through our academic schools:

  • School of Architecture and Design
  • School of Education
  • School of Engineering and Computing Science
  • School of Health Professions, Behavioral, and Life Sciences
  • School of Management
  • College of Arts and Sciences
  • College of Osteopathic Medicine

Chartered as a not-for-profit educational institution in 1955, NYIT receives consistently high rankings in national publications for its academic reputation and campus diversity. Its numerous professional accreditations and outside validations place it among some of the nation’s most prestigious institutions of higher learning.

The names of schools and colleges represented at campuses outside of New York can be consulted in the Student Handbook Amendments document provided with this Handbook at each location.

1.5 MISSION STATEMENT OF NYIT

From its beginning in 1955, New York Institute of Technology’s mission has been:

  • To provide career-oriented professional education
  • To offer access to opportunity to qualified students
  • To support applications-oriented research that benefits the larger world and reflects its aspiration to serve as a dynamic component of higher education opportunities available at the locations where it is based.

Thus, additional elements of the mission of NYIT are:

  • To integrate technology into all teaching and learning
  • To develop and disseminate information about technology-based education; and
  • To contribute to the development of a managerial and professional workforce able to support economic development and success at the locations where it is based.

1.6 VISION FOR A GLOBAL UNIVERSITY

In May 2006, the NYIT Board of Trustees adopted NYIT 2030: Setting Directions, Meeting Challenges, a strategic document guide institutional plans and efforts. A significant part of NYIT’s strategic planning dealt with the college’s aspirations as a global and at times a virtual university. The final report of the planning group described a view of the future this way: In 2030, NYIT will be a truly global institution rooted in a strong New York presence. Its campuses around the world will offer exemplary programs that will improve the quality of life for the populations in which they are located. Moreover, the University will have redefined what’s meant by a .global university as opposed to a university that simply has a global footprint. It will be among the first institutions to have designed itself from the ground up as a .21st Century University.

There is compelling strategic logic in NYIT’s aspiration to become a global university. Offering programs overseas is mission-related because it provides broader access to opportunity for students. NYIT is particularly well suited for the endeavor because of the international character of its faculty and student body in New York. NYIT’s programs enjoy strong overseas demand. Program currency will be enhanced by deep contact with other cultures, and a valuable social purpose served by bringing American-style wide-ranging debate to classrooms in many countries. NYIT 2030 also articulated a detailed vision of what NYIT will be in the year 2030: By 2030, NYIT will be:

  • Known for its career-oriented undergraduate and professional programs
  • Known for its thriving graduate centers featuring interdisciplinary degree programs and research
  • Known as a global and partially virtual university with NYIT in New York as its quality hub
  • Known as a model student-centered university
  • Known as a leader in teaching with technology
  • Known as a well-funded institution, with dependable revenue from a variety of sources

1.7 CHARTER AND LICENSURE

New York Institute of Technology, founded in 1955, is chartered by the Board of Regents of The University of the State of New York. NYIT is licensed by the relevant authority in each of its Global locations and is accredited a pursuing accreditation at the program and/or institutional level in each location as well

1.8 ACCREDITING AGENCIES

US Accreditations:

NYIT is accredited by The Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools; The Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. (ABET.org) for the Electrical and Computer Engineering program in the Old Westbury and Manhattan campuses, and the Mechanical Engineering program in the Old Westbury campus; Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission of ABET, Inc. for Electrical and Computer Engineering Technology; National Architectural Accrediting Board for Bachelor of Architecture; Council for Interior Design Accreditation programs, Old Westbury Campus; Commission on Accreditation. American Osteopathic Association for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine; Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA); Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) of the American Physical Therapy Association; Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA); Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE). The School of Education is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). This accreditation covers initial teacher preparation and advanced educator preparation programs. NCATE is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education and the Council for Higher Education Accreditation to accredit programs for the preparation of teachers and other professional school personnel.

Commission on Higher Education of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools
3624 Market St., Philadelphia, PA 19104-2680
Phone:267.284.5000; Fax: 215.662.5501
Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA)
4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449
Phone: 301.652.2682
Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant, Inc. (ARC-PA)
12000 Findley Rd., Suite 150, Johns Creek, GA, 30097
Phone: 770.476.1224
American Osteopathic Association (AOA)
142 E. Ontario St., Chicago, IL 60611
Phone: 312.202.8000
Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)
1111 North Fairfax St. Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703.684.2782
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE)
One DuPont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202.463.6930
Council for Interior Design Accreditation (CIDA)
206 Grandville Ave., Suite 350, Grand Rapids, MI 49503-2920
Phone: 616.458.0400
Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET)
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Phone: 410.347.7700
Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission (ETAC) of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc. (ABET)
111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012
Phone: 410.347.7700
National Architectural Board, Inc. (NAAB)
1735 New York Ave., N.W., Washington, D.C. 20006
Phone: 202.783.2007
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
2010 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Suite 500, Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202.466.7496

Global Accreditations:

Canada
Ministry of Advanced Education of British Columbia
P.O. Box 9059 STN PROV GOVT; Victoria BC V8W 9E2, Canada
Phone: 250 356-2771 Fax: 250 356-3000
China
The State Council Degree Commission of the People’s Republic of China
No. 37 Damucang Hutong, Xidan, Beijing; 100816 People’s Republic of China
Phone: 86-10-66096114
China (Jiangxi)
Jiangxi Provincial Department of Education
No. 567 Bayi Road, Nanchang, Jiangxi Province, 330046 People’s Republic of China
Phone: 86- 791-8636729; Fax: 86-791-8636729
China (Nanjing)
Educational Bureau of Jiangsu Province
No. 15 Beijing West Road, Nanjing City, Jiangsu Province; 210024 People’s Republic of China
Phone: 86-025-83239100
United Arab Emirates
Commission for Academic Accreditation, Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research
P.O. Box 45133, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Phone: +9712 6427772; Fax: +9712 6428488

NYIT was granted licensure in 2007 by the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, MOHESR: Commission for Academic Accreditation, CAA, in the United Arab Emirates, U.A.E. All programs offered in the U.A.E. have been granted initial accreditation by the CAA.

1.9 ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION

The overall governing body of New York Institute of Technology is the Board of Trustees. The President, who is the chief executive officer of the college, reports to the Board of Trustees. Reporting to and advising the President are: the Provost, the Vice President for Global Academic Programs, and other Vice Presidents. Each campus is led by an Executive Director/Campus Dean who is supported by other administrators, Assistant Deans and faculty. Together, they assure the academic programs and services offered are of the highest quality and meet the academic needs of students and faculty. In addition, each campus, and each academic program, may also create academic advisory boards to ensure that the institution is deeply rooted locally. The academic schools, based in New York, have the primary role in developing and administering academic programs. Each school is headed by a Dean who is the chief academic and administrative officer of that unit. Each school may contain a number of departments, or programs. On each global campus, each program is headed by an Assistant Dean/Supervisor (generic term), reporting to the Executive Director/Campus Dean on administrative issues, and to the academic Dean in New- York on academic issues. For specific programs, a program Chair may be appointed on the academic dean’s recommendation and the provost’s approval. Oversight for the NYIT faculty, curricula, and academic programs is provided by the Provost.

The President of NYIT is also advised by the Academic Senate on matters related to students, academic standards, financial and other resources, curricula, and other related areas that affect the college. The NYIT Academic Senate is comprised of faculty, professional staff and administrators. It acts as an advisory body to the institution, assists in setting policy in the areas of academic standards, admissions, curricula, budget, institutional development, communications, calendar, and educational technology, and provides a venue for constituencies to exchange ideas within the NYIT community. The Senate Executive Committee is responsible for setting agendas, committee appointments, and referring proposals to the full senate. Proposals come to the Executive Committee and the senate via 9 senate committees: Admissions and Academic Standards; Assessment; Budget, Finance, and Resource Allocation; Communication; Constitution; Curriculum; Educational Technology; Executive; and Institutional Development and Library Systems. A senate Web site publishes committee information, minutes, roster of senators, the constitution, proposals, and other relevant information for the NYIT community.

1.10 NYIT CENTRAL ADMINISTRATION – OLD WESTBURY

President

  • Edward Guiliano

Office of the President

  • Rahmat Shoureshi, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
  • Leonard Aubrey, Vice President for Financial Affairs, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
  • Barbara Ross-Lee, D.O., FACOFP, Vice President for Health Sciences and Medical Affairs
  • Harriet C. Arnone, Ph.D., Vice President for Planning and Assessment
  • Jerry Balentine, D.O., FACEP, Vice President for Health Services and Global Health Services
  • Niyazi Bodur, Ph.D., Vice President for Information Technology and Infrastructure
  • John Elizandro, Vice President for Development
  • Catherine Flinckinger, J.D., General Counsel
  • Nancy Donner, Vice President for Communication & Marketing
  • Peter Kinney, Chief of Staff
  • Patrick Love, Ph.D., Vice President for Student Affairs
  • Ron Maggiore, Ph.D., Vice President for Enrollment
  • Victoria Pfeiffer, M.B.A., Special Assistant for Financial Planning And Analysis

Office of Academic Affairs

  • Rahmat Shoureshi, Ph.D., Vice President for Academic Affairs and Provost
  • Judith DiMaio, R.A., M.Arch., Dean, School of Architecture and Design
  • Roger Yu, Ph.D. Dean, College of Art, Sciences and Communication
  • Patricia Chute, Ph.D., Dean, School of Health Professions, & Interim Dean, School of Education
  • Nada Anid, Ph.D., Dean, School of Engineering and Technology
  • Jess Boronico, Ph.D. Dean, School of Management
  • Patricia Burlaud, Ph.D., Dean, Operations, Assessment and Accreditations, Global Programs
  • Francine Glazer, Ph.D., Assistant Provost & Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning
  • Allison Andors, Ph.D., Director of Sponsored Programs and Research
  • Kristen Smith, M.A., Registrar

1.11 ORGANIZATIONAL CHART – LOCAL ADMINISTRATION

Details pertaining to the Global Campus NYIT Advisory Board can be found in the Campus Reference Book

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Student Affairs

2.1 FIRST-YEAR PROGRAMS

The first year of college life is crucial to strengthening a student’s ability to succeed at NYIT. NYIT’s First-Year Programs are designed to make this transition easier. The programs focus on teaching students strategies to enhance their academic skills while addressing their need for early social and intellectual bonding with faculty, staff, and peers.

2.1.1. ORIENTATION

The orientation program helps new and transfer students and their parents become acquainted with the college environment. They learn to identify campus resources, key faculty, staff and administration; learn about advising, registration, and other program procedures; and are introduced to the collegiate and student life environments.

2.2. STUDENT CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Student clubs and organizations are an extension of academic life at NYIT, and involvement in any campus activity is a definite plus for success. NYIT recognizes the value of student participation in academic, social, cultural, and athletic/sports clubs and organizations and encourages the organization of clubs and other shared-interest groups. Students who cannot find an existing club of interest should consider starting their own. To do so, they need only identify a small group of students who share a common interest. Please visit the Office of Student Affairs for additional information on joining or starting a club or organization.

2.2.1. RECREATION

Recreational programs are offered for men and women and take into account the cultural context of the location where the campus is based. Organized activities promote development through competition, teamwork, provide opportunities to improve emotional and psychological qualities, and develop skills in leadership, discipline, loyalty and fair play. Visit the Office of Student Affairs for information and schedules. Students are encouraged to recommend new activities.

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Counseling and Wellness Services: Non-U.S. Campuses

The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students is responsible for delivering special programs, workshops and time-limited groups on topics such as test anxiety, interpersonal skill building, time management, relationships, health issues, study skills, and other concerns. When specialized assistance is needed, referrals are made to hospitals, clinics, and other providers. Contact the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students to make an appointment and additional information about these services.

3.1. SPECIAL NEEDS

Students with special needs should contact the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students as early as possible in their program, preferably before taking any courses, for information about policies and procedures for requesting assistance due to a verifiable special need. NYIT provides reasonable accommodations for students with disabilities. Admission, course, and graduation requirements for students with special needs are the same as for all other students. Reasonable accommodations on a case-by-case basis will be made upon proof both of disability and need and availability of the accommodation. Accommodations for disabilities are meant to facilitate educational opportunities. Admission to NYIT and accommodations do not guarantee success. Accommodations may not incorporate all requests. Students with special needs are encouraged to take advantage of the services available to all students at NYIT. For more information please contact the Office of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students. Career Services

3.2. CAREER SUPPORT SERVICES

The Office of Career Support Services offers resources to help students develop lifelong career management skills and compete successfully in a global work force. Staff provides a personalized and professional approach to individual career planning and assists students in making short- and long-term career decisions. Workshops on résumé and cover letter writing, interviewing techniques, and successful job searches assist students in developing the outstanding self- marketing skills and materials that get noticed by prospective employers. The online job bank hosted in at NYIT in New York lists full-time, part-time, and summer positions as well as information about local employers and job search techniques.

With NYIT Career Net, the Central Office of Career Services online career management system, students can post or find employment opportunities, register for on-campus career events, send themselves e-mail updates, manage all job search-related documents, keep track of their job search schedule, and much more. Computerized tests and profiling software can suggest career options based a student’s interests and skills.

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College Services

4.1. ADMISSIONS AND REGISTRATION OFFICE

The Admissions and Registration Office provides information about programs, applications for admission, class schedules, academic forms, registration, transfer student information and forms, graduation applications, transcript requests, and grade processing, among other enrollment-related activities.

4.2. BURSAR/ACCOUNTS OFFICE

The Bursar/Accounts Office is where the students and their parents pay tuition and fees and receive information on payment dates and payment plans. Responsibility for meeting college costs rests with the student and the student’s family. It is also the student’s responsibility to follow up on financial paperwork to ensure everything is in order.

4.2.1. PAYMENT OF TUITION AND FEES

Tuition and fees are payable in full in accordance with the specified due dates published in the NYIT catalogs and posted on the NYIT Web site, www.nyit.edu. The privileges of the college are not available to the student until registration has been completed and tuition and fees paid. Students will not be permitted to attend classes unless payment in full is made by the due date as students are not officially registered until all tuition and fees are satisfied. Information regarding the payment plans is available at the Bursar/Accounts Office. All deferments of tuition and fees must be approved by the Office of the Bursar. Students are encouraged to contact this Office prior to the start of each term to ensure that their account is in order. By verifying that their account is in order, students can avoid late payment fees. Payments can be made in person at the Office of the Bursar or via mail.

4.3. ACADEMIC COMPUTING SERVICES

Computers are an integral part of every program at NYIT and they are essential tools for success in every career as well as in one’s personal life. It is essential to your academic success that you have a strong working knowledge of computers and the software they run, particularly the individual applications in the Microsoft Office suite. Computing workshops for students are offered by the Office of Technical Assistance.

4.3.1. COMPUTING ACCOUNTS

NYIT provides each student with a computer account and e-mail access shortly after admission to the college. Your user name and password will permit you to log on and use the specialized computers and software applications in classroom labs. Your NYIT e-mail will also be used to

communicate with you about your NYIT education, including dates for registration, information about your status, and information about upcoming events. Once you have your NYIT e-mail account, be sure to check for messages several times each week. It is essential that every student at NYIT access their NYIT email account, as doing so is the first step to accessing other electronic services at NYIT, including NYITConnect and the E-library.

4.3.2. NYITCONNECT

NYITConnect is a full-service Web-based student service portal. It permits students to check grades, schedules, review degree maps, and more. As online services are being added, you will be notified, and information about how to access the services will be provided.

4.3.3. STUDENT WEB SITES

Students are provided with the ability to host material on the NYIT IRIS Web server. Instructions on how to create your own personal Web site are contained below. Web pages may be created using any word processor capable of saving files in the HTML format or through the use of specialized web page creation software. Assistance in creating your own Web site is available through the online training program offered through the Center for Teaching and Learning with Technology (NYIT New York).

4.3.4. INSTRUCTIONAL COMPUTING LABS

Some majors require highly specialized computing capabilities, including special-purpose software applications. These are available in dedicated computer labs located on campus. The labs are open for student use according to program directives. See program coordinator for details on access to these labs.

4.3.5. E-LIBRARY AND OPEN ACCESS COMPUTER USE

In addition to labs, NYIT provides on-campus access to a state-of-the-art E-Library and computers for homework and academic use. These computers are available when the classes are in session. Trained staff members are available to assist you with any hardware or software questions you may have. These centers are free to all NYIT students with ID and a valid student account. Use of all technology is governed by NYIT’s Academic Computing Code of Responsibility which may be found in another section of this handbook. Use of NYIT technology implies agreement to abide by this code. The E-Library is also available through your personal computer.

4.4. LIBRARY SERVICES

NYIT provides a variety of library resources and services through our physical library and academic learning center on campus as well as through our state-of-the-art E-Library, which is accessible via the Internet from campus, your home, or to anywhere in the world. To use the library and the computer stations in the library and academic learning center, you must have a valid NYIT ID card. Your user ID will also enable you to access the library collections maintained by partner institutions, such as the Higher Colleges of Technology in the UAE or the University of Post and Telecommunication in China. Detailed information regarding local library access is available from the Executive Director/Campus Dean’s office. The NYIT libraries’ catalogs, subscription databases, and e-book collection (NetLibrary) can be accessed through the Library Services section of NYIT’s Web site.

The NYIT library is open when the college is in session. The daily hours of operation are posted in the library and other places throughout the campus and vary with the class and exam schedule. It is staffed by a professional librarian who is available to assist you. The NYIT-New York libraries’ catalogs, subscription databases, and e-book collection (NetLibrary) can be accessed through the Library Services section of NYIT’s Web site.

4.5. TEXTBOOKS AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES

To assure that students get the correct textbooks for their courses and have them in time to complete assignments, NYIT orders the textbooks and other print and non-print instructional media centrally. Students purchase the books and other materials at the beginning of each quarter. Note that all students are required to have their own copies of the books so they can work independently and keep up with all assigned readings and learning activities. Copying texts is an infringement of the authors’ intellectual property rights and copyright laws and is not permitted. Some students find it cost-effective to purchase used books from students who have taken the same course previously. This is permitted as long as the book purchased is the same edition that will be used in class. Students who drop a course and have already purchased a textbook for that course may return the unused book and obtain credit toward other textbooks, provided the returned book is in new, unmarked condition)

4.6. PRAYER ROOMS

See the Director of Students Affairs/Dean of Students for Prayer Rooms availability on campus or the relevant section in the Campus Reference Book.

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Academic Regulations

5.1 Academic Advisement

Academic advising is a critical component of all students’ educational experience. It helps students develop decision-making skills, think critically about goals and objectives, and assume responsibility for their actions and plans. NYIT offers a range of academic advising resources that include faculty advising, NYITConnect advising Web site, online degree maps, and the college catalog to assist students in making meaningful educational plans compatible with their career goals.

Every student must consult with an advisor prior to registration each term. This advisement occurs within the student's academic school or department, determined by the student's major. Appointments must be made with a faculty advisor in order for courses to be approved for registration. Students are assigned to advisors based on their major – assignment lists can be viewed at the Registrar’s office. Each faculty adviser gives the student advice and helps her/him to maintain satisfactory progress. Academic support is also available from faculty during office hours.

Students who alter their registrations in a manner inconsistent with the academic advice provided must recognize the potential for scheduling difficulties, delays caused by failing to take prerequisite courses in sequence, and other issues affecting their schedule, their academic progress, and their academic standing.

(NYIT-UAE students should consult Section 11.6 of this Handbook to read additional information regarding Academic Advising and Tutoring)

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Academic Integrity Policy: Preamble

In its mission to provide a career-oriented education, New York Institute of Technology strives to create a community of students, faculty and staff intent on teaching, learning and researching. As members of this learning community, students and faculty must work together to ask difficult questions of what we know and to discover what we have yet to learn. The foundation of academic work is intellectual integrity, credibility and trust. A learning community can only be maintained if its members believe that their work is judged fairly and that they will not be put at a disadvantage because of another member's dishonesty. For these reasons it is essential that all members of the NYIT community understand our shared standards of academic honesty. More than just a series of regulations, the Academic Integrity Policy serves as a guide for students and faculty for understanding these standards and their importance in the mission of NYIT.

5.2.2. SECTION II. DEFINITIONS

5.2.2.1. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Academic integrity is the pursuit of scholarly work in an open, honest and responsible manner. Academic integrity is a basic guiding principle for all academic activity at New York Institute of Technology, and all members of the college community are expected to act in accordance with this principle. Academic integrity includes a commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification, misrepresentation or deception in the completion of academic work. Such acts of dishonesty violate the fundamental and ethical principles of the NYIT community and compromise the worth of work completed by others.

5.2.2.2. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY

All members of the NYIT community are expected to observe high standards of academic integrity and ethical behavior in completing assignments for evaluation, testing, research and publication. Any practice or conduct by a member of the NYIT community that seriously deviates from the ethical standards that are commonly accepted within the professional community and as outlined in this policy constitutes academic dishonesty. Academic integrity violations encompass any act that compromises the integrity of the educational process. These violations include, but are not limited to:

1. Plagiarism

Plagiarism refers to representing the words or ideas of another as one's own in any academic exercise without providing proper documentation of source. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Copying information word for word from a source without using quotation marks and giving proper acknowledgement by way of footnote, endnote or intertextual note.
  • Paraphrasing or putting into one's own words information from a source without providing proper acknowledgement/citation.
  • Reproducing without proper citation any other form of work of another person, such as a slides, musical phrase, a proof, experimental data, laboratory report, graphics design or computer code.

It is the responsibility of all students to understand the methods of proper attribution and to apply those principles in all written, oral and electronic submissions. This information is available from instructors, library staff, library website nyit.edu/library and the Writing Center.

2. Cheating

Cheating refers to intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information or study aids in any academic exercise. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Copying from another student's examination, research paper, case write-up, lab report, and homework assignment or computer program.
  • Possessing or using unauthorized notes, text or other aids during an examination, quiz or other assignment.
  • Looking at someone else's exam before or during an examination.
  • Handing in the same paper for more than one course without the explicit permission of the instructors.
  • Possessing an electronic device that contains unauthorized information for a test or assignment such as programming one's computer or calculator to gain an unfair advantage.
  • Soliciting, obtaining, possessing or providing to another person an examination or portions of an exam prior or subsequent to the administration of the exam.
  • Talking, whispering or using a cell phone during an examination.
3. Unauthorized Collaboration

Unauthorized collaboration refers to working with other students without the instructor's permission in the preparation and presentation of reports, laboratory reports, homework assignments, take-home exams, term papers, research projects, case studies or otherwise failing to abide by the instructor's rules governing the academic exercise where the expectation is that the work to be completed is an individual and independent effort. Working in teams and collaborating with others in completing group projects and other assignments is an effective teaching pedagogy used by some instructors. However, collaborative learning must be sanctioned by the instructor. Students are encouraged to consult with the instructor if they are unsure about the assignment, course expectations or what constitutes unauthorized collaboration.

4. Fabrication

Fabrication refers to the intentional and unauthorized falsification, misrepresentation or invention of any information, data or citation in any academic exercise. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Falsifying or altering the data collected in the conduct of research.
  • Making up a source as a citation in an assignment or citing a source one did not use.
  • Attempting to deceive the instructor by altering and resubmitting for additional credit assignments, tests, quizzes or exams that have been graded and returned.
  • Stating an opinion as a scientifically proven fact.
5.Facilitation

Facilitation refers to intentionally or knowingly assisting any person in the commission of an academic integrity violation. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Allowing another student to copy one's answers during an examination.
  • Giving another student one's assignment or paper to copy or answers to a test or assignment.
  • Taking an examination or writing a paper for another student.
  • Inaccurately listing someone as co-author of a paper, case write-up, lab report or project that did not contribute.
  • Signing an attendance sheet for a student who was not present in class.
5. Misrepresentation

Misrepresentation refers to intentionally engaging in deceptive practices and misusing one's relationship with the college to gain an unfair advantage in the admissions process, access to programs and facilities, employment opportunities and any academic exercise. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Arranging for another student to substitute for oneself during an examination session or in the completion of course work.
  • Taking credit for work not done, such as taking credit for a group assignment without participating or contributing to the extent expected.
  • Falsifying, misusing, omitting or tampering with official college information in any form including written, oral or electronic including test scores, transcripts, letters of recommendation or statements of purpose to gain initial or continued access to the college's programs or facilities.
  • Altering, changing, forging or misusing academic records or any official college form regarding oneself or others.
  • Causing any false information to be presented at an academic proceeding or intentionally destroying evidence important to an academic proceeding.
  • Reporting an academic integrity violation known to be false.
  • Misrepresenting or falsifying class attendance or that of another student.
6. Participation in Dishonest Acts

Some dishonest acts that undermine the fundamental values of an intellectual community fall outside of the more specific academic integrity violations described above. Examples include, but are not limited to:

  • Purchasing a pre-written paper through a mail-order service.
  • Selling, loaning or otherwise distributing materials for the purpose of cheating, plagiarism or other academically dishonest acts.
  • Intentionally missing an examination or assignment deadline to gain an unfair advantage.
  • Stealing or attempting to steal an examination or answer key from an instructor, proctor or staff member.
  • Infringing upon the right of other students to fair and equal access to any library materials and comparable or related academic resources.
  • Attempting to prevent access by other users to the college's computer system and its resources, to degrade its system performance, or to copy or destroy files or programs without consent.
  • Offering bribes (e.g., monetary remuneration, gifts or favors) to any college official in exchange for special consideration, waiver of procedures or change of grade on an assignment or course.

5.2.3. SECTION III. REPORTING VIOLATIONS OF ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

Students, faculty and staff share in the responsibility for maintaining the academic standards of the college, for promoting integrity and for upholding the Academic Integrity Policy. To protect the rights and maintain the trust of honest students and support appropriate behavior, instructors should regularly communicate high standards of integrity and reinforce them by taking reasonable steps to anticipate and deter acts of dishonesty in all assignments and examinations. To promote a learning environment that is built upon the fundamental values of honesty, trust, fairness, respect and responsibility each NYIT community member is encouraged to confront instances of suspected wrongdoing and to report alleged violations of the Academic Integrity Policy to the appropriate instructor, Assistant Dean/Supervisor, Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students, or Executive Director/Campus Dean. A standard Academic Dishonesty Incident Report or a personal letter or meeting with the appropriate college official are all appropriate means by which referrals are made. Students are not obligated to report suspected violations, but they are encouraged to do so. Students may also approach those involved in alleged academic dishonesty to remind them of their obligation to uphold standards of academic integrity.

The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students, or Executive Director/Campus Dean (depending on the campus location), in collaboration with the schools on campus, maintains a log of academic integrity violations to track offenses, and to detect repeated occurrence of such offenses. For repeated student offenders, academic sanctions including expulsion, as listed in Section 5.2.4, are applied with the utmost severity, depending on the level of the offense, and as the outcome of the Academic Dishonesty Review Process.

5.2.4. SECTION IV. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY REVIEW PROCESS

There are two (2) types of forums provided by this code to review alleged violations of the Academic Integrity Policy.

A. Academic Resolution (Informal)

The instructor has the primary responsibility for control over classroom behavior and maintenance of academic integrity. Students involved in academic dishonesty, either directly or indirectly as a participant are immediately responsible to the instructor of the course who is obligated to address the alleged violation. Academic resolutions are conducted by the instructor of the course in which an alleged violation of the Academic Integrity Policy has occurred. When an instructor suspects that a student may have violated the college's policy, the instructor shall meet with the student to discuss his or her concerns and present the student with any supporting evidence and documentation. The student shall be afforded the opportunity to respond to the allegations and to offer an explanation.

1. Student Accepts Responsibility

At an academic resolution meeting if the instructor and the student agree that a violation has occurred and the student accepts responsibility for the violation, the instructor may at his or her discretion impose the following academic sanctions or grade penalties:

  • Issue the student a verbal warning together with advice about what is acceptable academic conduct.
  • Change the grade on the assignment, including lowering or assessing a failing grade.
  • Change the grade for the course, including lowering or assessing a failing grade.
  • Allow the student to resubmit the assignment or retake the exam.
  • Assign additional academic work or alternative assignments.

Imposing additional sanctions such as disciplinary probation, suspension, expulsion or removing a student from class are outside the purview of the instructor and may not be issued as part of the academic resolution process. These sanctions may only be rendered through the formal disciplinary process administered by the Office of the Director of Student Affair/Dean of Students.

2. Student Does Not Accept Responsibility

At the academic resolution meeting if the student does not accept responsibility and/or disputes the allegation or decision of the instructor, the instructor will assign an (I) Incomplete grade on the assignment or in the course pending the outcome of a hearing before the Discipline Review Board as outlined in this code. Students assessed an (I) Incomplete grade will be allowed to continue in the course without prejudice pending the outcome of the formal disciplinary process. If the course ends before the Discipline Review Board has acted, the instructor will submit the (I)

incomplete grade to the Registrar's Office pending a hearing before the Discipline Review Board. At the conclusion of the disciplinary process the instructor will submit a Change of Grade form with the Registrar's Office reflecting the outcome of the disciplinary hearing and the instructor's evaluation of the student's work in the course.

3. Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report

At the conclusion of the academic resolution meeting with the student, the instructor will complete an Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report signed by both parties indicating whether or not the student has accepted responsibility for a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy and any academic sanctions or grade penalties imposed.

The Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report may also be used by the instructor to request a formal review of the matter by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students' Office and the Discipline Review Board. A copy of the report and all supporting evidence and documentation should be forwarded to the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students' Office and to the Assistant Dean/Supervisor within five (5) business days at the conclusion of the academic resolution process. The Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report serves as the official record of the meeting and will become part of the student's disciplinary record maintained by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students' Office.

4. Meeting with the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students

Upon receipt of the Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report, the Director of Student Affairs/ Dean of Students will meet with the student who has accepted responsibility for a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy to review the policy and to stress its importance; outline the resources and services provided by the college to assist students in completing writing assignments and who may be experiencing academic difficulty; and issue a written warning indicating that a further violation of the Academic Integrity Policy will be attended by more serious disciplinary sanctions. In cases where a student is assessed and accepts a failing grade for the course by the instructor, the student will be informed that he/she is no longer allowed to attend the class. A summary letter of the meeting will be sent to the student and a copy forwarded to the instructor and Assistant Dean/Supervisor. In cases where the student does not accept responsibility for a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students will initiate the formal disciplinary process outlined in Section IV (B) of this code.

5. Academic Resolution Appeals

A student who accepts responsibility and agrees with the academic sanctions or grade penalties imposed by the instructor as part of the academic resolution process cannot appeal the decision to a higher authority, Discipline Review Board or the Grade Appeals Committee. The decision and sanctions imposed by the instructor are final. A student who does not accept responsibility and/or disputes the allegation or decision of the instructor has the right to have the matter reviewed by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students' Office with a possible referral to the Discipline Review Board.

B. Discipline Review Board (Formal)
1. Authority and Jurisdiction

Administrative authority and responsibility for disciplinary policies and procedures on all NYIT campuses including international and global sites and in on-line courses is delegated by the President to the Vice President for Student Affairs. Jurisdiction of disciplinary matters involving violations of the Student Code of Conduct is assumed by the campus Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students. The formal process used by the college to resolve alleged violations of the Academic Integrity Policy is a review of the matter by the campus Discipline Review Board.

2. Composition of Board

Formal hearings are conducted by the campus Discipline Review Board which consists of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students who serves as chair, four (4) faculty members from different schools appointed by the Executive Director/Campus Dean, four (4) students appointed by the Student Government Association, and two (2) administrators from different departments appointed by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students. The chair selects two (2) faculty members, two (2) students and one (1) administrator to hear each case and members serve on a rotating basis. Board members are appointed for two year terms.

3. Initiating Charges

The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students is responsible for investigating complaints of alleged violations of the Academic Integrity Policy and the Discipline Review Board will be called upon to hear cases under the following circumstances:

  1. If after a thorough review of a complaint it is determined that there is sufficient evidence to formally charge a student with a violation of the policy.
  2. If at the conclusion of the Academic Resolution (Informal) process the student disputes the allegation and does not accept responsibility for violating the Academic Integrity Policy or disagrees with the sanction(s) imposed by an instructor.
  3. A review of a student's disciplinary record indicates a second reported violation of the Academic Integrity Policy. warrants a review by the Discipline Review Board.

If the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students Office determines that there is insufficient evidence to charge a student with a violation of the policy the formal disciplinary process will not initiated and all parties will be notified in writing. If there is insufficient evidence to formally charge a student with a violation of the policy and the instructor chooses to issue an academic sanction or grade penalty, the student has the right to request a review of the matter by the Grade Appeals Committee.

4. Notice of Charges

Upon receipt of an Academic Dishonesty Resolution Report, Academic Dishonesty Incident Report or letter of complaint, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students will provide the student with a written notice of the charge including specific code violations and a brief description of alleged offense(s) within five (5) business days via certified mail. The charged student will be provided an opportunity to attend an information session with the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students or designee, during which the student may review all materials to be used in his/her case including his/her disciplinary file, receive information regarding due process rights and procedures used in a disciplinary hearing, discuss the allegations upon which the charge is based, and obtain a copy of the Student Handbook and a list of additional resources.

If a student fails to respond to a request to schedule an information session and/or attend a scheduled information session within three (3) business days of receipt of notification, the student waives his/her right to an information session and a Discipline Review Board hearing will be scheduled.

5. Hearing Notification

Charged students shall receive notice of a Discipline Review Board hearing within five (5) business days prior to the hearing. Written notice shall include the date, time and location of the hearing. If the charged student fails to appear at the scheduled hearing or fails to provide adequate written notice requesting a postponement due to extenuating circumstances, the hearing will be held in the student's absence. The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students will determine whether the extenuating circumstances warrant a rescheduling of the hearing. No student may be found responsible for a violation of the Student Conduct of Code solely because the student failed to appear before the Discipline Review Board. The decision of the Board will be determined based on all the documentation and testimony presented at the time of the hearing.

6. Discipline Review Board Procedures

All formal hearings will be conducted using the following procedures:

  1. Presentation of formal charges by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students (Chair of the Discipline Review Board).
  2. Brief review and affirmation of student rights and responsibilities by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students.
  3. Administration of an oath of honesty and truthful testimony to the charged student prior to testimony before the Board.
  4. Opening statement by the charged student.
  5. Questioning of the charged student by the Board.
  6. Administration of an oath of honesty and truthful testimony to each witness prior to testimony before the Board.
  7. Presentation of evidence and/or testimony by the instructor or designee followed by questions from the Board and student. The student will present questions for the instructor to the Board Chair. The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students reserves the right to determine the method for delivery of questions and to determine the relevance of the question(s).
  8. Presentation of witnesses on behalf of the instructor or designee followed by questions from the Discipline Review Board and the student. Witnesses are excluded from the hearing except during their own testimony. Written statements may not be admitted into evidence unless signed by the witness. A copy of all written statements will be provided to the Discipline Review Board and the charged student prior to the hearing.
  9. Presentation of evidence and witnesses by the charged student followed by questions from the Discipline Review Board and the instructor or designee. The Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students reserves the right to determine the relevance of the questions. Witnesses are excluded from the hearing except during their own testimony. Written statements may not be admitted into evidence unless signed by the witness. A copy of all written statements will be provided to the Discipline Review Board and the instructor prior to the hearing.
  10. Follow-up questions to the charged student and instructor or designee.
  11. Closing statement by the instructor or designee.
  12. Closing statement by the charged student.
  13. Adjournment.

All Discipline Review Board hearings are private and closed to the public. Formal hearings are taped via audio recording and the audiotape will serve as the official record of the hearing.

7. Role of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students

The role of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students when presiding over a Discipline Review Board hearing is to advise the student of his/her rights under the Student Code of Conduct; maintain an orderly hearing ensuring that all parties are treated with respect and free from intimidation or harassment; make all administrative decisions on matters relating to the admission of relevant evidence, testimony and questions; and administer the oath of truthful testimony to all participants.

8. Deliberations and Burden of Proof

At the conclusion of a Discipline Review Board hearing all parties except members of the Board are excused and the Board deliberates. The standard burden of proof used in all disciplinary cases is "preponderance of evidence." The term "preponderance of evidence," means that evidence, considered as a whole, indicates the fact sought to be proved is more probable, or that it is more likely than not the alleged behavior did violate the Academic Integrity Policy. The burden rests with the college and the student is presumed not responsible. Responsibility is determined by a simple majority vote of the Board members, except in cases involving expulsion, which must be unanimous. A student's academic and previous disciplinary record may not be used to determine responsibility but may be taken into account in determining appropriate educational and disciplinary sanctions.

Deliberations are not audio taped but the vote count, decision rendered and sanctions imposed are taped and become a part of the official record of the hearing.

9. Sanctions

If the Board determines that a student has violated the Academic Integrity Policy it has full discretion to impose the following sanctions:

  1. Warning – A written reprimand to the student that further violation of the Academic Integrity Policy will result in more serious disciplinary action.
  2. Educational Assignment– Required participation in a development task for the purpose of making a positive contribution to the student's well-being such as attendance at an educational workshop, research project, essay, meetings/interviews with college officials, planning and implementing educational programs, or other activities.
  3. Disciplinary Probation – A specified period of time during which a student has the opportunity to demonstrate his/her ability to be a responsible member of the NYIT community. A student on probation is prohibited from holding an office or being elected to any honorary society. May be restricted from participation in other activities as determined by the Board.
  4. Suspension – Suspension from academic enrollment and revocation of other privileges or activities, and the privilege to enter all NYIT campuses for a period of time not to exceed two (2) years. Conditions that will permit the student's readmission, if appropriate, will be specifically outlined in writing. Any communications with the college and student during the period of suspension will be directed to the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students.
  5. Expulsion – Complete termination of student status and academic enrollment for an indefinite period of time. This sanction may be recommended, but shall be imposed by the Executive Director/Campus Dean. Conditions that will permit the student's readmission, if appropriate, will be specifically outlined in writing. Any communications with the college and student during the period of expulsion will be directed to the Executive Director/Campus Dean.
10. Academic Sanctions and Grade Penalties

The Discipline Review Board does not have the authority to issue academic sanctions or grade penalties in cases where a student is found responsible for violating the Academic Integrity Policy. The evaluation of a student's academic work and issuing a course grade is the responsibility of the instructor. However, the Board may make a recommendation to the instructor for consideration. In cases where a student is found responsible for an academic integrity violation by the Board and the student has exhausted the disciplinary appeals process allowed by this code, the student cannot appeal the academic sanctions or grade penalties imposed by the instructor to the college's Grade Appeals Committee. The Board sanctions and any academic sanctions or grade penalties imposed by the instructor are final. In cases where a student is found not responsible for an academic integrity violation by the Board and the instructor chooses to impose an academic sanction or grade penalty to reflect the outcome of the formal hearing, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students will refer the matter to the college's Grade Appeals Committee.

11. Findings

The decision of the Discipline Review Board will be communicated in writing to the student within five (5) business days at the conclusion of the hearing. The decision letter will include a summary of the evidence or finding of fact used to support its determination, any sanction(s) imposed, and the procedure for appeal. The instructor and Assistant Dean/Supervisor will be sent a copy of the outcome letter.

12. Discipline Review Board Appeals

Any student found responsible for a violation of the Academic Integrity Policy may request a review of the determination of responsibility and/or of the sanction(s) imposed by the Discipline Review Board. The burden of proof at the appellate level rests with the student to clearly show that an error has occurred during the disciplinary process. The appeal process is not a re-hearing of the disciplinary case, rather a review of the specified error as outlined in Grounds for Appeal. Decisions of the Discipline Review Board may be appealed to the Executive Director/Campus Dean. A written appeal must be submitted within three (3) business days of the receipt of the written decision of the Discipline Review Board. If the Board's decision is not appealed within this time frame, the original decision and all academic sanctions and grade penalties imposed by the instructor become final.

13. Grounds for Appeal

Failure to describe the nature of the evidence in full detail in the appeal letter will result in the denial of an appeal. Appeal considerations are limited to:

  1. A violation of a student's rights which substantially affected the outcome of the hearing. Appeals based on this consideration will be limited solely to a review of the record and tape recording of the disciplinary hearing.
  2. The evidence presented during the hearing was not substantial enough to justify a decision by the Discipline Review Board. Appeals based on this consideration will be limited solely to a review of the record and tape recording of the judicial hearing.
  3. New evidence is available which was not available at the time of the original hearing and could have substantially affected the outcome. The nature of the evidence must be described in full detail in the appeal letter.
  4. The severity of the sanction is disproportionate to the nature of the offense.

5.2.5. SECTION V. RIGHTS AND PROCEDURAL SAFEGUARDS

Instructor

An instructor has the right to:

  1. Consult with the Assistant Dean/Supervisor, other faculty, Executive Director/Campus Dean, or Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students to determine a course of action. If the evidence does not substantiate a violation, the matter will be dropped.
  2. Determine the student is not responsible for or involved in academic dishonesty after a meeting with the student.
  3. Meet with a student as part of the informal academic resolution process and impose any or all academic sanctions and grade penalties outlined in this policy.
  4. Request a formal review of the incident by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students Office at the conclusion of the academic resolution process.
  5. Participate fully in a Discipline Review Board hearing including providing testimony and any supporting documentation, call and cross-examine all witnesses, provide recommendations to the Board related to possible sanctions if the student is found responsible for a violation, and to be notified of the hearing outcome.
Student

A student has the right to:

  1. Meet with the instructor as part of the informal academic resolution process to respond to the allegations and offer an explanation. The student may accept responsibility for the violation and the academic sanctions or grade penalties imposed by the instructor.
  2. Clear and complete notice of the charge(s) and a brief description of the allegations upon which the charge is based.
  3. A designated opportunity to review all information in his/her judicial file prior to a hearing.
  4. A fair and impartial hearing.
  5. An opportunity to present relevant evidence and information on his/her behalf, including presenting witnesses and/or signed written statements, unless waived for informal academic resolutions or where a student accepts responsibility for the charge.
  6. Cross-examine witnesses as circumstances permit. Appropriate witnesses may be called by the college to all formal hearings. Those witnesses who appear may be cross-examined by the charged student in an appropriate format determined by the Board chair. If called witnesses do not appear, their written or taped statements will be considered by the hearing body.
  7. Accompanied by an advisor selected by the student at all stages of the formal judicial process (Discipline Review Board). The advisor may not serve as a witness or represent the student before the hearing body. The student must speak for him/herself.
  8. Not provide self-incriminating testimony. Choosing not to do so does not constitute an admission of responsibility. However, absent such testimony, the hearing body may lend more weight to written documents and testimony of witnesses.
  9. Notification of the decision of the hearing in writing within five (5) business days after the conclusion of the hearing.
  10. Appeal the decision of the Discipline Review Board in writing within three (3) business days of the receipt of the hearing decision.
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Academic Standing

5.2.6. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

At the conclusion of each term, two averages are computed for each student to indicate the general level of academic standing. The first is called the grade point average (GPA), which indicates the scholarship level for the quarter. The second is called the cumulative grade point average (CGPA), which indicates the scholarship level for all work taken at the college. The GPA is computed by adding all the quality points associated with the grades earned for the quarter/term and then dividing by the number of credits for those courses. The CGPA, computed in a similar manner, represents all the quality points associated with the grades earned during all the terms the student has attended NYIT, divided by the number of credits for those courses. Exception: For students who have changed majors, only quality points from the first degree program that are applicable to the present degree program are included.

Students receive one of the following grades for each course taken during the quarter:

Undergraduate Grading Scale Graduate Grading Scale
Letter Grade Grade Points Letter Grade Grade Points
A4.00 4.00
A-3.67  
B+3.33B+3.33
B3.00B3.00
B-2.67  
C+2.33C+2.33
C2.00C2.00
C-1.67  
D+1.33  
D1.00  
F0.00F0.00

Additional Grades: The grade of PR (Progress, Re-enroll) is used only for developmental courses and intensive English as second language courses for students who have made some progress, but who do not demonstrate satisfactory skills to pass those courses. Students are required to re-enroll in those courses in order to complete them. Required courses in which a grade of F was received must be taken over again. In those cases where a student failed a course and has retaken and passed it, only the passing grade shall be used, but the F shall remain on the transcript as a matter of information. The only courses which may be repeated for credit are those which result in the grades of C-, D+, D, W, WF, F or PR and IF. Students who have earned a C-, D+, D, W, F, WF, IF or PR in a course may retake the course for credit (one or more times) to earn a higher grade. Only the higher grade will be used in computing the GPA and CGPA. The other grade(s) will remain on the student's record as a matter of information.

Fall and spring semesters are 15 weeks long. The number of semester hours of credit earned for a course corresponds to the number of academic hours of instruction in a standard week. Two, or in some cases, three academic hours of laboratory or studio work in a standard week during a semester constitute one credit for most programs. Summer session classes are scheduled for an equivalent number of academic hours. Semester hours of credit are granted for the grades A, A-, B, B+, B-, C+, C, C-, D+, D or P.

The grade "I" (Incomplete) may be assigned if the student has not completed all course work by the end of the term, but is passing the course, has missed a minimal number of assignments or examinations, has intentions of completing the course in a relatively short period of time, and if there is reasonable expectation to complete the course satisfactorily. "I" grades should be fully documented. The temporary incomplete "I" grade, given by the instructor after consultation with the appropriate dean, is used when a student, because of some unavoidable circumstance, has been unable to complete all assigned work for the course. The instructor must certify that the student's work is passing at this point, and the student agrees to complete the missing assignments. When the work is completed, the instructor will forward the replacement grade to the registrar. Effective with the fall 2003 semester, the temporary grade of "I" shall change to a failing grade, IF (Incomplete Failing), if the student does not complete all work by the end of the allotted time (see academic calendar for dates). Such an "IF" grade may not be challenged, and the course must be repeated by the student to receive credit. An "I" will precede any grade given after completion of the course.

The following policies shall guide the awarding and calculation of the I grade and the change of the I grade to an IF grade: The student must request additional time to complete a single project, report or final examination. The grade of incomplete is to be assigned only to students who are otherwise passing the course at the end of the semester. The instructor has the right to refuse the request and may assign a final grade based solely on the work already completed. The grade of incomplete will change to the failing grade if the outstanding course work is not completed in accordance with the schedule in effect at the time it was assigned, regardless of the average the student otherwise maintained in the class (see academic calendar for dates). A single short extension of the time period shall be granted only in exceptional circumstances by the vice president for academic affairs. The grade of incomplete will not be assigned to students with excessive absences, especially when those absences include the final sessions of the course, unless extenuating circumstances have been established. The incomplete grade is recorded by the registrar as .attempted credits, until the course is complete. The incomplete grade that changes to a failing grade will carry zero quality points. The temporary grade of incomplete (I) shall change to a failing (IF) grade if the student does not complete all work by the end of the allotted time (see schedule below). Such an IF grade may not be challenged, and the course must be repeated by the student to receive credit. The following policies shall guide the awarding and calculation of the I grade and the change of the I grade to an IF grade:

  1. The student must request additional time to complete a single project, report or final examination;
  2. The grade of incomplete is to be assigned only to students who are otherwise passing the course at the end of the term;
  3. The instructor has the right to refuse the request and may assign a final grade based solely on the work already completed;
  4. The grade of incomplete will change to the failing grade if the outstanding course work is not completed in accordance with the schedule in effect at the time it was assigned, regardless of the average the student otherwise maintained in the class (the schedule is found below);
  5. A single, short extension of the time period shall be granted only in exceptional circumstances by the dean;
  6. The grade of incomplete will not be assigned to students with excessive absences, especially when those absences include the final sessions of the course, unless extenuating circumstances have been established;
  7. The incomplete grade is recorded by the Registrar as "attempted credits," until the course is complete;
  8. The incomplete grade that changes to a failing grade will carry zero quality points;
  9. Students can advance if an incomplete grade is assigned to a prerequisite course for the term immediately following the assignment of an I grade but cannot advance after an I grade changes to an IF;
  10. When the grade of incomplete is changed to an IF, the I grade shall remain on the record and the transcript so that it will read IF, thereby distinguishing it from the F and the WF grades;
  11. I grades may have an effect on the student's visa or other status. Students are encouraged to meet with their advisor prior to requesting the I' option.

The grade of "PR" is used only for developmental courses and intensive English as a second language courses for students who have made some progress but who do not demonstrate satisfactory skills to pass those courses. Students are required to re-enroll in those courses in order to complete them. Please refer to the NYIT Web site under the Worldwide section and then to the specific campus for current deadlines for the completion of incomplete courses

Change of Major – Undergraduate Programs

A change of major requires an official request, evaluation, and approvals by deans in both programs and the Registrar, and documentation. Once the request is formally approved and the change is made to the student's official records, a faculty advisor for the new major is then responsible for advising the student about selection of courses for each term. Students who wish to change majors must:

  1. Pick up a change of major form and credit evaluation form at the registration office;
  2. Bring the change of major form to the chair of the program from which the transfer is being made and secure the chair's approval and signature;
  3. Bring the change of major form and the credit evaluation form to the chair of the program being transferred to and secure an evaluation of credits toward the new degree and the chair's approval and signature.
  4. Then bring the signed forms to the Executive Director/Campus Dean's office for the dean's review and signature.

The Executive Director/Campus Dean's office will provide a copy of the signed forms to the student and to the student's academic file and send the official signed forms to the registration office to have the change made to the student's official record. Students should be aware that all credits may not transfer from the old to the new major and that this may affect students' academic level, the time it will take to complete the degree and the total cost of their education.

Change of Major – Graduate Programs

Students who desire to transfer from one NYIT graduate program to another must notify the Assistant Dean or Executive Director/Campus Dean that they are leaving their initial program and they must apply to and be formally accepted by graduate admissions and by the chair of the program to which they want to transfer. Requests for transfer of credentials should be made to the Registrar's office. If a student has a GPA of less than 3.0, or a classification status other than fully matriculated, the requested program must be approved by the dean. Students should be aware that all credits may not transfer from the old to the new major and that this may affect students' academic level, the time it will take to complete the degree and the total cost of their education. This information can be attained from the "What If feature" of My Advisor that full-time faculty have access to via NYITConnect.

Change of Classes (Drop/Add)

Students are permitted to add and drop courses as well as transfer between sections of the same class during the first two weeks of semester. To do so, the student must fill out a Drop/Add form, meet with an academic advisor to receive stamped approval, and then take the form to the Registrar's office for processing. If there is a change in the number of credits previously registered for, the student must reconcile the changes in fees with the bursar. During summer sessions, however, students can only add or drop classes without financial penalty before the first scheduled day of a course.

5.2.7. CLASS ATTENDANCE

Students are expected to attend all classes. While instructors are not required to make attendance a variable in determining final grades, faculty may set the number of allowable absences at a specific number or percentage of class sessions, and may deduct from a student's grade if absences exceed this amount. Students are required to attend at least 85% of the classes, otherwise they will receive - F grade in the course in which they exceeded that level. The faculty member's policy on attendance must be clearly described in the course syllabus and noted verbally in class at the first class meeting. Clear criteria for excused absences must be provided. Attendance policies must be applied consistently to all students in the class. Students' attendance can significantly affect their financial aid and tuition obligations, and thereby their own and NYIT's financial resources. Class attendance records will be submitted to the dean's office at the end of the term along with other course documents.

5.2.8. CLASS STANDING

5.2.8.1. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Students shall be defined as freshman if they have earned less than 31 credits, sophomores if they have earned from 31 to 62 credits, juniors if they have earned from 63 to 96 credits, and seniors if they have earned more than 96 credits.

Classification of Undergraduate Students by Credits

  • Freshman … Less than 31 credits earned
  • Sophomore … 31–62 credits earned
  • Junior … 63–96 credits earned
  • Senior … More than 96 credits earned

A student may take a maximum of 18 credits per semester. A student on the Dean's (See section 5.2.13) list may take a maximum of 21 credits per semester without special permission. To take 22 or more credits in one semester, a Dean's list student must have permission from the Assistant Dean/Supervisor and the Admissions Office.

5.2.8.2. GRADUATE STUDENTS

Students are normally allowed to carry nine credits, or three courses per semester. A program beyond nine credits may be permitted if a student has given evidence of the ability to complete such a program successfully.

5.2.9. COMPLAINTS ABOUT A COURSE OR AN INSTRUCTOR

If a student has complaints about a course or an instructor, the first step is to speak with the instructor involved. If a satisfactory understanding cannot be reached, the student should make an appointment to see the Assistant Dean/Supervisor responsible for the specific course. If the matter remains unsolved after meeting with the Assistant Dean/Supervisor, an appeal may be made to the Academic Dean of the School or College offering the course, through the Executive Director/Campus Dean's office. Providing supporting documentation regarding the matter is recommended. For all other complaints (such as complaint about an Assistant Dean for instance, or non-academic complaints), students need to refer to the section 10: Student Rights, Responsibilities, and the Grievance Policy.

5.2.10. COMPUTER REQUIREMENTS

All NYIT programs require the use of computers and Internet to complete course assignments and for research. Computer labs and open-use computers are available for students registered in a program of study. Each NYIT student will receive a systems account giving them access to the Internet and other user services such as NYIT Connect. It is important to note that each account owner and workstation user is solely responsible for the usage incurred through her/his account/workstation. Anyone who intentionally abuses accounts and privileges, degrades system performance, misappropriates computer resources or interferes in any way with the operation of the computer facilities is subject to cancellation of privileges and disciplinary action. Students, other than those receiving approved accommodations for a disability, are prohibited from using electronic recording devices in the classroom without prior permission from the instructor. For further information please see the NYIT Academic Computing Code of Responsible Technology Usage.

5.2.11. DEAN'S AND PRESIDENTIAL LIST (UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS ONLY)

A full-time matriculated student who has attained a minimum grade point average of 3.50 or higher in any semester in which he or she completed 12 or more credits (without any I grades) or a part-time matriculated student who has attained a minimum grade point average of 3.60 or higher in any semester in which he or she completed six or more credits (without any I grades) has earned a place on the Dean's Honor List. Students who meet the same standards and earn a 3.70 or above are placed on the Presidential Honor List. Notification of these awards is sent to students, and the appropriate honor is recorded on their transcripts.

5.2.12. DEGREES WITH DISTINCTION

5.2.12.1. UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

A graduating student who has attained a cumulative quality point average of at least 3.70 receives the baccalaureate degree summa cum laude; at least 3.50, magna cum laude; and at least 3.20, cum laude. Students must complete 55 percent of all coursework at New York Institute of Technology. If 55 percent of the work was not taken at NYIT, only grades for courses accepted as transfer credit from previous colleges will be computed into the cumulative grade point average. Students must first receive at least a 3.20 at NYIT before transfer credits are computed into the cumulative average. Fifty-five percent of all college grades must be in the form of letter grades from either NYIT or a former college. Student with less than 55 percent of discernible letter grades are not considered for honors. These distinctions are notes on students' diplomas as well as on their transcripts.

5.2.12.2. GRADUATE STUDENTS

A graduating student who has earned a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or better will graduate with distinction. Honors are recorded on both the student's permanent record and diploma. In addition, programs may offer awards to outstanding graduate students at commencement.

5.2.13. EARLY WARNING

After each term, students who are placed on probation or suspension are notified by e-mail or SMS text messages of their need to make an appointment with their Assistant Dean regarding their academic standing. It is strongly suggested that students alerted on their academic standing meet with the school administrator immediately.

5.2.14. ENGLISH LANGUAGE PLACEMENT EXAMINATIONS

NYIT offers its courses and other educational activities in English. Students must have an appropriate level of listening, speaking, and writing skill in English in order to be academically and personally successful in their college career. Applicants must earn an appropriate score on TOEFL or IELTS examinations to be admitted; 550 TOEFL, 6.0 IELTS. Undergraduate students must also take the English Language Placement test to be placed in an appropriate level of English courses and have permission to take upper level courses. Students whose scores show they do not have the requisite language skills for success will not be admitted

5.2.15. ENROLLMENT OF STUDENTS

Individuals who wish to enroll in the college for the purpose of earning a degree must file a written application for matriculated status. The college reserves the right to refuse matriculation for specific NYIT programs. NYIT reserves the right to review a degree candidate's status at any time on the basis of performance and progress. Non-matriculated students may be admitted to individual courses if they meet the prerequisites for these courses. Students who initially enroll as non-matriculants will be limited in the number of credits they may take as a non-matriculated student. An undergraduate may take up to 12 credits and a graduate student may take up to 6 credits. After they have reached that limit, they will need to apply and be admitted before continuing to take courses.

5.2.16. FAILURE

Required courses in which a grade of F was received must be taken over again. In those cases where a student failed a course and has retaken and passed it, only the passing grade shall be used, but the F shall remain on the transcript as a matter of information. The only courses that may be repeated for credit are those that result in grades of C-, D+, D, W, WF, F or PR, and IF or reduced grades because of plagiarism must appeal through the Academic Integrity Policy procedures, not through the procedures described in this document.

5.2.17. GRADE APPEALS

1. Basis for grade Changes

Students who disagree with the grade they receive in a course may appeal the grade within 30 days of the deadline for the Faculty Member to hand in grades. Grades can be considered for change only if there is unequivocal evidence of one or more of the following:

  • The grade was incorrectly calculated
  • A clerical error was made in recording the grade
  • The instructor discriminated against the student on the basis of gender, race, religion, national origin or other classification * Arbitrary and capricious conduct by the instructor
  • A mitigating circumstance prevented the student from completing final course requirements. [In such case, the grade would be changed to "I" and the student would have a set period of time to complete the work, in accord with NYIT's policy on grades of Incomplete.]

The student begins a grade appeal by filling out a change of grade form, which can be collected from the Executive Director/Campus Dean's office. The completed form should clearly state which of the five grounds for appeal is relevant and unequivocal supporting evidence for the claim should be supplied by the student at this time. Completed forms are then forwarded by the Executive Director/Campus Dean's office to the instructor for review of class materials and the formulation of a written response on the form within ten days. Once completed by the student and the instructor, the form is forwarded by the Executive Director/Campus Dean's office to the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students for consultation with the relevant Assistant Dean. Should the position of Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students not be filled by an NYIT employee, the Executive Director/Campus Dean will fulfill this role. If the Assistant Dean agrees with the instructor to change the grade, a change of grade form is filled out by the instructor, the Registrar, and the Executive Director/Campus Dean. If the instructor and Assistant Dean are in agreement that the grade should not be changed, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students is notified and relays the negative result to the student. If the student disagrees with the outcome, he has the right to appeal to the Grade Appeal Committee within 5 working days of being notified via the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students. If the instructor and the Assistant Dean disagree on the grade appeal, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students will forward the case to the Grade Appeals Committee. The Grade Appeals Committee shall meet upon request from the Executive Director/Campus Dean. In the event that NYIT no longer employs the instructor, a student's challenge shall commence with the Assistant Dean.

The Grade Appeal Committee comprises of the Executive Director/Campus Dean who will chair the committee and the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students who are non-voting members of the committee. In addition the Grade Appeals Committee comprises of two full-time faculty members from the relevant school (the faculty member that issued the initial grade is excluded from the committee), and one full-time faculty member from a different school. The faculty member that issued the grade and the student appealing the grade are invited to the meeting, but are not required to be present. A grade awarded under Academic Dishonesty may not be appealed under this procedure, unless the charge has been resolved in favor of the student pursuant to NYIT's Academic Integrity Policy. The Executive Director/Campus Dean will issue his decision based on the recommendations from the Grade Appeals Committee. This decision is final and binding.

In cases where the grade has been changed to an “I”, the student shall have one additional semester and a summer beyond the final decision of the Grade Appeals Committee in which to complete the work. The temporary grade of (I) shall change to a failing (IF) grade if the student does not complete all work by the end of the allotted time (see schedule in the catalogue). Such an IF grade may not be challenged, and the course must be repeated by the student to receive credit.

2. Report and Determination of the Grade Appeals Committee

As mentioned above, and based on the recommendation from the Grade Appeal Committee, the Executive Director/Campus Dean will issue his decision which, at this point will be final and binding. This decision will be notified by the Executive Director/Campus Dean's Office to the student, the instructor, the Assistant Dean and the Grade Appeals Campus Committee for their records.

No grade maybe changed by the central New York Registrar without the signatures of the instructor, the Assistant Dean and the Executive Director/Campus Dean. It should also mention: “Grade Appeal” on the change of grade form.

5.2.18. REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION

  • The satisfactory completion of a designated program of study for the degree, as verified by the school of the student's major and by the Academic Senate; Students are responsible for ensuring that all degree requirements listed in the catalog in effect on the date of their matriculation are fulfilled. Errors on degree maps or senior advisement forms do not constitute a basis for waiving degree requirements.
  • All students who wish to be considered candidates for an undergraduate degree must file an application for graduation with the registrar at the beginning of their last semester.
  • A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.00 (Some programs require a higher CGPA);
  • All undergraduate students must complete a minimum of 50% of credits at NYIT. Depending upon the major field of study, other additional requirements may apply for graduation. Some major fields of study have additional requirements, and students are responsible to ensure that they have met all academic standards for graduation. Completed graduation applications must be filed with the registration office by the published deadline.

5.2.19. TIME LIMIT FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

In the best interests of the student and the college, a maximum of five years is allowed for completion of degree requirements. Under exceptional conditions, an additional year may be permitted upon formal request to the appropriate Assistant Dean and approval by the Academic Dean.

5.2.20. MAINTENANCE OF ACADEMIC STUDY FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

Students must have a graduate quality point average of 3.0 or better in order to graduate. Accordingly, those whose graduate academic record falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and must raise the quality point average to 3.00 within one semester, in order to return to full academic status. Students whose graduate academic record includes two or more C's not balanced by A's or includes any failures in coursework may be dropped from the program.

5.2.21. GRADUATION CRITERIA – GRADUATE PROGRAMS

Prior to the expected graduation date, graduate students must meet the following academic standards:

  1. The satisfactory completion of a designated program of study for the degree, including thesis, project, comprehensives and other requirements. Students are responsible for ensuring that all degree requirements listed in the catalog in effect on the date of their matriculation are fulfilled. Errors on degree maps or advisement forms do not constitute a basis for waiving degree requirements.
  2. A minimum cumulative quality point average of 3.00.
  3. Some majors have additional requirements. Students are responsible for meeting all academic standards for graduation.
  4. Completed graduation applications must be filed with the registration office by the published deadline.

5.2.22. MATRICULATED STATUS

A matriculated student is one who has been accepted as a candidate for a doctorate, master's, bachelor's or associates degree. The college reserves the right to review a student's qualifications for continuing matriculation based on performance. Non-matriculated or special students are defined as those who are not working toward a degree. These students either do not fulfill the minimum entrance requirements for degree programs or, although eligible for candidacy, do not wish to matriculate. They may be admitted to individual courses within their field of interest or to a limited number of courses in any one term)

5.2.23. HONOR SOCIETIES

International and national honor societies recognize students' scholarly achievement. In addition to general honor societies, NYIT has several discipline-specific chapters that recognize achievement in a specific field.

  • The Phi Eta Sigma National Freshman Honor Society accepts full-time matriculated students who have earned a 3.5 grade point average during their first year of registration in the college and who have not completed more than 20 semester hours or 30 quarter hours at another college or university after high school graduation and before matriculation at NYIT. * Nu Ypsilon Tau honors students who have achieved a GPA of at least 3.40 for at least 62 credits earned and for transfer students who have completed a minimum of 45 of the 62 credits at NYIT and have earned a CGPA of 3.40.
  • The Golden Key International Honour Society accepts full-time, fully matriculated students who have successfully completed at least fifty 50 semester hours, with at least 25 of those semester hours at NYIT, and have demonstrated scholastic excellence by maintaining a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.
  • Delta Mu Delta – achievement in business.
  • Tau Alpha Pi – achievement in engineering technology. * Alpha Epsilon Rho – achievement in communication arts and broadcasting any further information should be requested from the Director of Student Affairs.

5.2.24. OFFICIAL TRANSCRIPTS

To have an official transcript sent out, students must go to the Office of the Registrar to complete a transcript request form. A fee must be paid for each transcript, and one week should be allowed for the request to be processed. No transcript will be issued unless the student's bursar account is clear.

5.2.25. PREREQUISITE AND CO-REQUISITE COURSES

Many courses require prerequisite and/or co-requisite courses. A prerequisite course must be passed prior to taking the desired course, and a co-requisite course must be taken at the same time (or in some cases taken before). Prerequisites are listed in the catalog. It is the student's responsibility to meet all necessary course prerequisites and co-requisites. If a student enrolls in a course but has not fulfilled the prerequisites or co-requisites for this course, the Assistant Dean/Supervisor has the authority to administratively withdraw the student from course. A waiver for a co-requisite or pre-requisite course may be granted by the academic Dean on the recommendation off the Assistant Dean.

5.2.26. PROBATION AND DISMISSAL POLICY - UNDERGRADUATE

A student must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (CGPA) of 2.00 in order to graduate. A minimum CGPA of 1.70 as a freshman, 1.90 as a sophomore and 2.00 as a junior or senior must be achieved to maintain satisfactory academic status at NYIT.

An undergraduate student at NYIT must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 to graduate. A minimum cumulative GPA of 1.70 as a freshman, 1.90 as a sophomore, 2.00 as a junior or senior must be achieved to maintain satisfactory academic status at NYIT. (GPA calculations are truncated after the second decimal place, and not rounded.)

Probation I: The first time an undergraduate student's cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required, the student shall be placed on Probation I for his/her next regular term. The student will receive a letter from the Registration Office outlining available academic support services and requiring the student to meet with an academic advisor. Additionally, a student on Probation I status may be prevented by the Assistant Dean or designee from registering for more than 12 or the minimum full-time credits in future semesters until he/she is removed from probation.

Probation II: When an undergraduate student is on Probation I and his/her cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required for two sequential terms, the student shall be placed on Probation II for his/her next regular term. The student will receive a letter from the Registration Office outlining available academic support services and requiring the student to meet with an academic advisor. A student on Probation II status cannot register for more than six credits until he/she is removed from probation.

Dismissal: When an undergraduate student's cumulative GPA falls below the minimum required for three sequential (but not necessarily continuous) regular terms, the student will be dismissed from the college. Dismissal is defined as ineligible to pursue credit-bearing courses at NYIT for a period of two academic years or until a minimum GPA of 2.0 is earned for the most recent 24 credits taken at another accredited institution of higher education. The decision of dismissal shall be automatically appealed to the Executive Director/Campus Dean. The Executive Director/Campus Dean may uphold the dismissal decision or may recommend reversal of the dismissal decision and may impose additional conditions for continuing registration. The Executive Director/Campus Dean may also appoint a committee to address these cases. The Executive Director/Campus Dean may also appoint a committee to address the case. Students are limited to one appeal per term and the Executive Director/Campus Dean's decision is binding and final.

5.2.27. PROBATION/DISMISSAL POLICY – GRADUATE STUDENTS

Graduate students must have a grade point average of 3.0 or better in order to graduate. Accordingly, those whose graduate GPA falls below 3.0 will be placed on academic probation and must raise their GPA to 3.0 within two semesters in order to be removed from probation. Students whose graduate academic record includes two or more C's not balanced by A's, or includes any failures in coursework, may be dropped from the program. Students who have earned a C or F in a course may retake the course to earn a higher grade. Only the higher grade will be used in computing the GPA; however, the original C or F will remain on the record as a matter of information. The only courses that may be repeated for credit are those which result in grades of C, W, F, IF, U, or WF.

Responsibilities of the Committee on Academic Probation and Dismissal:

The Committee on Academic Probation and Dismissal is a subcommittee of the Admissions and Academic Standards Committee and is charged with reviewing the transcripts of students who fail to meet the college's minimum retention standards and to make decisions for remedial action or dismissal from the college. The Committee on Academic Probation and Dismissal will meet at least twice a year, after the fall and spring semesters, to review academic transcripts and make decisions. The committee may request and utilize supporting documentation from faculty, advisors, administration, and students to make its decisions. The committee shall work to develop a method to inform faculty and advisors of its decisions for remedial action or dismissal from the college. Students have the right to appeal a decision for remedial action or dismissal, and the committee will review the appeal and either overturn or stay its original decision. Students are limited to one appeal per semester, and the committee's decision is binding and final. Voting members of the Committee on Academic Probation and Dismissal include: Chief academic officer or designee, Chief student affairs officer or designee, Coordinator, Central Advising Center, Dean of each school or designee.

5.2.27. PROGRAM CHANGE (DROP/ADD)

A student is permitted to change courses as well as sections during the drop/add period as long as his or her advisor has approved the change. To effect a change of program, a student is required to file an official change-of-program form. No change of program may be made after the second week of each term. Students may drop and add courses without financial penalty during this period as long as the drop does not result in a full withdrawal from courses for the term. Students who drop to zero credits are considered to have fully withdrawn from NYIT and are subject to tuition charges in accordance with the NYIT refund policy. Please refer to the withdrawal period to determine your tuition and fee liability.

Traditional Semester:

  1. Dropping at any time from the date of registration through the last day of the second week of the semester - 100 percent refund on the tuition and the college fee.
  2. Dropping at any time after the start of the third week of the semester - no refund.

Summer Course:

  1. Dropping at any time from the date of the student registration to the day before the first scheduled day of the course - 100 percent refund of the tuition and the college fee.
  2. Dropping at any time during the second week of course - 50 percent refund of tuition only.
  3. Dropping at any time after the start of the third week of the course - no refund.

5.2.28. READMISSION OF FORMER GRADUATE STUDENTS

Former graduate students of NYIT who wish to return and/or resume study must apply for readmission. If a student's last date of attendance was within the past five years, the student must complete and submit a readmission form through the Office of Admissions and Registration. If a student's last date of attendance was more than five years ago, the student must complete and submit a new application for admission.

5.2.29. READMISSION OF FORMER UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Former undergraduate students of NYIT who have not attended within the last five years are required to re-apply through the Office of Admissions. Once readmitted to the college, students must fulfill the curriculum requirements in effect at the time of readmission. Those who have not attended NYIT within five years, and who are within 30 credits of degree completion, may make a request to the dean to follow the curriculum in place at the time of initial admission. The dean's approval shall be based on compliance with accreditation, federal and state regulations, accredited or registered degree offerings, among other factors.

5.2.30. REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

NYIT makes every effort to provide registration information in advance of each registration period. Students are responsible for completing their registration process by the publicized date. Registration procedures are the same for all students. The schedule of tuition and fees is subject to change. Check tuition and fee schedule each term. Early registration within the period designated assures the most flexible choice of program and eliminates early cancellation of under-enrolled course sections. A course may be cancelled by NYIT for any reason, including insufficient enrollment. Official registration in a course section is required in order to earn a grade for a class. Registration must be completed by the end of the change of program period (see Academic Calendar). Therefore, students who have not officially registered for a course section will not receive a grade retroactively. Students are not officially registered until all tuition and fees are satisfied. Attendance is not permitted in any class without official registration for that class.

5.2.31. CANCELLATION OF COURSES

A course may be cancelled by NYIT during the add/drop period for any reason, including insufficient enrollment. If a course is cancelled, the student will be refunded any fee s/he may have already paid. In the event that the student wishes to enroll in another course, the fees already paid may be used toward payment for the new course.

5.2.32. SCHOLASTIC DISCIPLINE

The continued registration of any student is dependent upon regular attendance, proper conduct and achievement of passing grades. Any one of the following is regarded as sufficient cause for dismissal: irregular attendance, neglect of work, conduct deemed by the college not consistent with general good order, or failure to comply with the college's rules and regulations. The college reserves the right to terminate a student's enrollment at any time. Every student has the right to appeal a termination decision. Contact the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students for information about the appeals process. See also Student Code of Conduct, Academic Integrity, and other policies in this Handbook

5.2.33. SECOND BACHELOR'S DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Students who already hold a bachelor's degree may earn a second bachelor's degree by satisfying the following requirements;

  • Upon application to the Office of Admissions, the student should seek formal advisement from the Assistant Dean. With this advisement on record, the student may proceed and be reviewed for acceptance into the program.
  • A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 must be earned in the courses taken at NYIT for the second degree.
  • The work toward the second degree must be completed in a major or program distinctly different from the major or program in the first degree.
  • A student must complete all core requirements of an NYIT bachelor's degree. The work in the major area of concentration must be completed in accordance with the requirements listed in the applicable catalog.
  • A minimum of 36 credits over and above any used to satisfy the requirements of the first bachelor's degree must be completed at NYIT. A minimum of 18 of these 36 credits must be in the new major field of concentration.

Note: to complete a new major/concentration may require significantly more than 36 credits. Students may not re-take courses previously completed toward the first degree. Students should have an approved degree map on file showing an academic plan at the start of their studies.

5.2.34. TAKING COURSES AT OTHER COLLEGES

No student will be permitted to take a course(s) at another college unless the following conditions are met:

  • Student must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or higher.
  • Student must have a zero bursar balance. Students wishing to take courses at other colleges must obtain a permission to attend another college form from the Admissions Office. The form must be signed by the Assistant Dean and Executive Director/Campus Dean and returned to the Admissions Office before the course is taken. Upon completion of the course, the student must request that an official transcript be sent to NYIT's Office of the Registrar from the college at which the course was taken. Upon completing the course, students are responsible for furnishing the NYIT registrar with official transcripts so that credit may be entered on their records. An official transcript must be received at NYIT no later than one month after completing the course. A grade of C or better is required for credit. Students on probation may not take courses at another college.
  • All educational intuitions must be accredited.

5.2.35. WITHDRAWAL FROM A COURSE

The decision to withdraw from a course is a serious matter and should be made by the student only after consulting with the course instructor and faculty advisor. Students withdrawing from a course are not entitled to a refund of tuition. Students may withdraw from any course within the first eight weeks of the semester (or within 8 meetings of cycle classes) and receive the grade of W (Withdrawal). After the first eight weeks of the semester (or after the 8th meeting of cycle classes) students may withdraw with the transcript notation of W only if they are passing at the time and receive the instructor's permission. After the 8th week or equivalent, if the student is failing the course a grade of WF will be assigned. Official Withdrawal from courses requires the submission of the withdrawal form to the registrar with both the student's and the instructor's signature. Faculty may indicate that the student is not passing the course when the student requests a withdrawal after the 8th week or equivalent. Furthermore, the instructor may assign a WF on the final grade roster if a student has stopped attending the course, but may not assign the W. The grade of F is appropriate when a student had been regularly attending classes, but did not pass the course. Withdrawal forms are available in departmental offices and once completed must be filed with the Registrar.

5.2.36. WITHDRAWAL FROM THE COLLEGE

Students who wish to withdraw from the college may initiate an official withdrawal by contacting the registration office and obtaining a Withdrawal from the College form. Depending on the circumstances, the student's withdrawal date will be recorded as the date the student began the withdrawal process or the date the student notified the College of his/her intent to withdraw. Tuition refunds, if any, will be based on the withdrawal date. If a student withdraws with a balance due on his/her account, no transcript, information or employment references will be furnished until the account is cleared.

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Student Code of Conduct: Non-U.S. Campuses

The NYIT Student Code of Conduct is summarized below. Students can contact the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students for a copy of the full policy and procedures regarding the Student Code of Conduct (Policies & Procedures Manual, Policy A-12).

6.1. NYIT PREAMBLE

As a global institution, the New York Institute of Technology strives to fulfill its academic mission at all of its campuses in a manner that is true to its core values and purposes and is respectful of local traditions and culture. To this end, students and staff of NYIT are obligated through their association with NYIT to conduct themselves in a manner that is consistent with the values of New York Institute and the cultural context of the location where the campus is based. Clothing, behavior, and topics of discourse must fit the generally accepted expectations of modesty and respect for local culture. The deliberate violation of established rules or procedures at NYIT is unacceptable in a learning community and NYIT will act immediately to ensure that the situation is corrected.

6.2. OFFENSES

The Code of Conduct provides in greater detail information about expectations and offences. The list below is a brief summary of those actions that will result in disciplinary action. If a student is found to have acted in a way contrary to the expectations of NYIT, sanctions will be imposed. The following are examples of prohibited forms of conduct:

  • Unauthorized use or access of NYIT computers, network, or accounts
  • Disruptive conduct that interferes with the functions of NYIT and its staff
  • Offensive or vulgar language either in writing or in speech
  • Possession, purchase, consumption or use of illegal substances
  • Clothing that is immodest, inappropriate, or excessively casual
  • Interference, violence, or threatening the mental or physical health, safety or well-being of others on the NYIT campus
  • Failure to comply with a request or directive of an NYIT official
  • Providing false or misleading information to an NYIT official
  • Actions that results in damage to or loss of NYIT property
  • Conduct that creates an intimidating, hostile, unsafe, or threatening environment
  • Immoral or immodest conduct
  • Littering, defacing, or damaging any NYIT property
  • Smoking in areas that are designated as non-smoking
  • Theft, trespass, or vandalism property of another or of NYIT
  • Possession of any type of weapon or object that can be used as a weapon

Violations of the Code of Conduct are reviewed by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students, or when appropriate, by the Executive Director/Campus Dean, in accord with the policies and procedures outlined in the full Code of Conduct document. Sanctions for violating the Code of Conduct include warnings; fines and restitution; campus access restrictions; disciplinary probation; suspension; and, expulsion from NYIT. An appeals procedure is provided. See the Executive Director/Campus Dean and Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students for a full copy of the Code of Conduct.

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NYIT Computing Code of Responsible Technology Usage: Non-U.S. Campuses

New York Institute of Technology provides computing resources for the academic research and instructional purposes of its faculty, staff and students. Computing resources include host computer systems, college-sponsored computers, workstations, software, data sets and communication networks. Generally, computing systems and equipment are used carefully and appropriately. However, abuse of equipment or systems that causes disruption of users' productivity and the integrity of their data and programs may be subject to discipline or prosecution under college policies and host country laws.

7.2. PURPOSE

The purpose of the Academic Computing Code is to define responsible computer usage, particularly for new users who may not be aware of the potential impact of their actions.

7.3. COMPUTER ETHICS POLICY STATEMENT

Computers, telecommunications and information in electronic form create a need for ethical models. Information owners, both individual and institutional, must make a conscious and explicit effort to state and enforce their expectations of ethical behavior. Information users have an obligation to recognize the information owner's rights in order to protect and preserve their own rights to use that information. Computer-based information, recognized as a primary educational and research asset, should be protected from unauthorized modification, destruction, disruption or disclosure – whether accidental or intentional.

7.4. STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITIES

College Responsibilities: NYIT assumes the responsibility to ensure the integrity of its computing systems, workstations and laboratory facilities. The academic computing systems offer file protection that can only be modified by an authorized user. Since no system is absolutely secure, however, usage will be monitored to ensure that irresponsible users cannot affect the performance and integrity of other accounts and other users' information. User Responsibilities: Each account owner and workstation user is solely responsible for the usage incurred through his/her account/workstation. Individuals, who intentionally abuse accounts and privileges, degrade system performance, misappropriate computer resources or interfere in any way with the operation of the computer facilities are subject to penalties.

7.5. STANDARDS FOR COMPUTER USAGE

Access and use of college academic computing systems and computer services is defined below. It applies equally to all users of college-owned and college-operated information systems and equipment.

  • Any access prohibited by law is unauthorized.
  • Any access or use in support of activities that are prohibited by law is unauthorized.
  • Any use of subsidized accounts that is not specifically authorized by institutional policy is unauthorized. Individuals who willfully cause loss to authorized account holders by unauthorized access or use shall be held financially responsible for the cost of restoring that user's data, programs and account balance. Violators who are members of the NYIT community will be subject to disciplinary action under regulations applying to their respective status within the college.

All violators will be subject to prosecution under laws that apply.

7.6. OPEN COMPUTING LABORATORY ACCESS AND USE POLICIES

Many of the campus computing laboratories are open to the college community. The host computer systems and some of the laboratory workstations require that all users have an appropriate computer account. Account holders are issued a unique account ID and password that are needed to access those computer systems or workstations. Access to computer laboratory facilities by any individual may be restricted or denied for, but not limited to, the following reasons:

  • Unauthorized use of account ID and/or password, including but not limited to ineligibility (account holders must be affiliated with the college);
  • Unauthorized changes to laboratory hardware or software, including but not limited to:
  • Disconnecting/reconnecting or reconfiguring hardware;
  • Removing, changing or reconfiguring files on laboratory disks;
  • Damaging laboratory hardware or software or removing any laboratory hardware from the premises;

Failure to observe laboratory policies, procedures and protocol, including but not limited to:

  • Refusing to leave the laboratory promptly at closing time;
  • Refusing to respond to or responding inappropriately to requests made by laboratory staff (e.g., a request to move to another machine, to limit output pages to the printer, etc.) in the normal course of carrying out their job responsibilities;
  • Using threatening or abusive language or behavior directed at anyone in the laboratory facility;
  • Attempts to bypass security measures, such as access permissions to files, or obtaining permissions or account attributes with or without authorization.

7.7. COMPUTER ABUSE

The following are examples of computer abuse (This list is illustrative and not meant to be all- inclusive):

  • Frivolous, disturbing or otherwise inconsiderate conduct including extensive use of workstations for game playing, sending nuisance messages, wasteful or unauthorized use of college-supported facilities, or disturbing or allowing access to programs that erase or alter files surreptitiously;
  • Use of a computer account to perform computing services for unauthorized commercial purposes, either inside or outside of the college;
  • Possession, in a workspace or file, or use of programs capable of fraudulently simulating system responses; modification of or possession of systems control information, especially that which reflects program state, status or accounting; attempts to modify or crash the system;
  • Unauthorized use of a password or account ID; unauthorized access to another person's files; using or changing, without authorization, another person's password;
  • Any violation of the NYIT Student Code of Conduct that involves computer resources.

Violations of this code, including the above list, may lead to any of the following disciplinary measures:

  • Termination of a program or online session; the system manager may log off an irresponsible user at a workstation; similarly, a harmful job running under the operating system may be canceled without notice;
  • Invalidation of an account ID or account number;
  • Reduction of allocations or restrictions of account privileges;
  • Disciplinary action by ACL or OIT administrators, supervisors or laboratory managers;
  • Serious incidents may be referred directly to the appropriate academic authorities.
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Accommodation Policy for Students with Disabilities: Non-U.S. Campuses

It is the policy of New York Institute of Technology to provide reasonable accommodations for students who are otherwise qualified but have disabilities, including learning disabilities, health impairments, and other disabling conditions. Possible accommodations include, but are not limited to, test schedule modifications, class relocation, and possible assistance in acquisition of necessary equipment. Admission requirements for disabled students are the same as for all other students. The Institution has an interest in helping students with disabilities to be competitive in this academic environment. Therefore, reasonable accommodations will be made upon proof both of disability and need for the accommodations. It must be understood that accommodations are meant to facilitate educational opportunities. Admission to NYIT and accommodations do not guarantee success. Students whose disabilities may require some type of accommodation must complete a request for accommodations form and an intake interview with their campus coordinator prior to the academic semester. Accommodations maybe requested at any time during the semester; however, accommodations cannot be applied to past failures, only to future academic endeavors. Appropriate modifications of accommodations will be worked out on a case- by-case basis and will not necessarily incorporate all requested changes. In addition to discussing appropriate educational modifications, the campus coordinator will serve as a liaison with other college faculty and administration on behalf of students with disabilities. Students, other than those receiving accommodations for a disability approved by the campus coordinator as, are prohibited from using electronic recording devices in the classroom without prior permission from the instructor. Students with disabilities are encouraged to take advantage of the following related services available to all students at NYIT:

  1. Individual, confidential counseling and advisement
  2. Academic monitoring, career counseling and general study skills, time management and goal setting assistance
  3. Referral to qualified resources for diagnostic evaluation of learning disabilities at the student's expense

NYIT does not offer students with disabilities the following:

  1. Diagnostic evaluation for disabilities
  2. Special classes
  3. A reduced standard for academic performance
  4. Exemption to graduation requirements
  5. Credit for effort in place of demonstrated competence in the content Students wishing to discuss or identify barrier problems, should contact their campus coordinator.
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Posting of Publicity: Non-U.S. Campuses

Posters, flyers, banners and other forms of signs and/or advertising at NYIT must conform to NYIT regulations and must be individually approved by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students and stamped prior to being posted. The college reserves the right to refuse requests for postings of information by non-NYIT organizations, private individuals, groups, etc. Posting is not permitted on painted surfaces, trees or building exteriors. Approved materials must be posted on designated bulletin boards and glass partitions. Student clubs and organizations that post flyers inappropriately are subject to the possible suspensions of their privileges and/or fines. Flyers and other advertisements must be removed within 24 hours after the event has taken place. If a flyer is written in a language other than English, the flyer must include an English translation. Use of any bulletin board or authorized space in any building on the campus does not constitute an endorsement or guarantee of any product, service or information by NYIT. Students or student organizations in violation of any of the preceding regulations are subject to disciplinary action or financial sanction. Outside organizations in violation of these policies will not be permitted to post any information or use NYIT facilities, and criminal charges may be pursued.

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Ownership of Student Work: Non-U.S. Campuses

All work presented or submitted in fulfillment of or in conjunction with a student's course work shall be the property of NYIT, which may waive this right at its discretion. Students may request reproductions of their work for their portfolios.

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Rights to Media Productions Developed in NYIT Coursework

This policy covers video and audio productions, films, slide/tape presentations and other non- print media. All films and videotapes produced at the school in fulfillment of class assignments or as advanced individual study projects, whether made on school premises or elsewhere, with or without school equipment, with or without extra funds, are subject to the following ownership policy:

  1. All such films and tapes are co-owned by the student and the school. In each case, students who make the film/tape should decide which student or students co-own the film/tape with the school.
  2. Either the student or the school may arrange distribution; students who do not wish to have films/tapes distributed may veto distribution.
  3. The school will decide whether or not to put its name on a given film or tape.
  4. Distribution deals, whether arranged by the school or by the student, must be approved and signed by the dean of the appropriate academic school.
  5. All income after print costs and other in-front obligations are paid will go directly from the distributor to the student and the school on a 50/50 basis; outside funding is not considered to be an in-front obligation.
  6. The school's income will be used for scholarships, for funding future student films/tapes and for fees and expenses in connection with placing student films/tapes in festivals. If a film/tape wins a prize, that prize goes to the student minus the cost of placing the film/tape in competition. If that cost is estimated to overcome the prize, and only if a written authorization of the Executive Director/Campus Dean is issued, the school will pay the difference.
  7. Films/tapes may be distributed only after a faculty advisor has made sure that all necessary clearances have been obtained by the student(s).
  8. The student and the college each have a right to prints (e.g., copies) at cost as such prints are needed for NYIT or student use; such prints may not be rented or sold.
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Harassment

Harassment on the basis of race, sex, religion, or any other protected class, evidenced by persistent words, conduct or actions directed at an individual that badger, annoy, threaten or cause substantial emotional distress is strictly not tolerated on the NYIT Campus. Slurs and other verbal/nonverbal or physical conduct directed to an individual because of his/her membership in a protected class is considered to constitute harassment when this conduct:

  1. Has the purpose or effect of creating an intimidating, hostile or offensive working or school environment; or
  2. Has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work or student's performance in school including his/her performance in curricular, extracurricular, and nonacademic activities; or
  3. Otherwise adversely affects an individual's employment or a student's opportunities in curricular, extracurricular, and nonacademic activities.

NYIT strongly supports academic freedom and does not intend this policy to prevent or limit discussion of ideas, taboos, behavior or language as an essential element of course content, even if opinions and ideas expressed cause some discomfort. Every member of the NYIT community is encouraged to refuse, firmly and without apology, to submit to subtle or overt pressure with sexual, religious, political or other overtones. The Executive Director/Campus Dean and Assistant Deans have a particular responsibility to promote work, living, and study environments free of verbal and physical harassment. Complaints of harassment by an NYIT employee should be directed to the Office of Human Resources, which is authorized to convene the Harassment Grievance Committee. Complaints of harassment by an NYIT student should be directed to the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students, who has the authority to commence student disciplinary proceedings. The complete harassment policy is available at the Office of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students (Policies and Procedures Manual D-2.9).

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Alcohol and Drug Prevention Policy: Non-U.S. Campuses

New York Institute of Technology (NYIT), as part of its mission to provide career-oriented professional education to its students, recognizes the importance of providing an environment that is conducive to learning and free of substance abuse.

NYIT prohibits the sale, distribution, consumption, possession, and use of all illegal substances on campus and at NYIT-sponsored student events off campus. Violations of this policy have serious consequences and may include expulsion from NYIT.

All students must note that NYIT maintains a drug-free and illegal substance-free workplace in keeping with the spirit and intent of the cultural sensitivity of the host country. The use of illegal substances is inconsistent with the behavior expected of students on NYIT campuses. In this regard, NYIT prohibits the unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensing, possession, sale, or use of an illegal substance on campus.

"Illegal substances" are all substances prohibited by law. Use of exceptionally controlled substances is lawful when authorized by a duly administered medical prescription with the visa of the local Ministry of Health.

The complete Alcohol and Drug Prevention Policy is available at the Office of the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students (Policies and Procedures Manual D-2.8).

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Smoking Policy: Non-U.S. Campuses

Smoking is prohibited in all campus buildings. Smoking is permitted in designated outdoor areas.

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College Identification Cards: Non-U.S. Campuses

A college photo ID card must be obtained from the Admissions and Registration Office as soon as possible after admission to NYIT. The ID card must be carried at all times while on campus and must be presented on demand to any college official. The card can be used to check out library materials and is used for entry into campus events, labs, and other facilities. The first ID card is free of charge, but there is a fee for a replacement card.

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Driving and Parking on Campus: Non-U.S. Campuses

At NYIT locations where campus parking is available, it is understood that many students, faculty and staff drive to the NYIT campus every day to attend classes and work. For everyone's safety and well-being, it is essential that all traffic signs, and posted speed, parking, entrance/exits, right-of-way and related directions are followed. Courtesy to pedestrians and drivers is expected at all times. The campus has ample marked spaced in student and staff car parks. Faculty should park only in these designated car parks as appropriate. Parking in a roadway, on sidewalks, or non- designated area is prohibited. Cars should not obstruct any access route, driveway, curb-cut or emergency escape route. Vehicles that are parked in violation of the campus rules are subject to towing at the driver's expense. Drivers are responsible for the safe operation of their cars on campus and are responsible for any fines, fees, towing or other charges incurred during its presence on campus. NYIT assumes no liability for damage or loss to private vehicles, their occupants or contents while on campus or attending NYIT related functions off-campus.

Only at locations where campus parking is available.

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Fire Safety

All campus buildings have marked fire exits, with designated fire assembly points in areas surrounding the buildings. Students are encouraged to note these locations for the buildings they use. Also they should also note the location of fire extinguishers and other equipment in these buildings. If anyone discovers a fire, he/she should sound the fire alarm immediately using the nearest break-glass unit. They should leave the building immediately by walking calmly and quickly to the nearest fire exit. Use of the lifts (if any) is not permitted then. Packing up belongings should not occur. Students should not re-enter the building until a fire official tells them it is safe to do so.

On each campus of NYIT, students and faculty find a Campus Security service that provides continuous, year-round security. These security officers are trained to respond to a variety of calls for assistance, from medical emergencies to crimes in action. Patrols of campus grounds/buildings are made frequently and include inspection of the premises to note any potential problems, such as lights that have gone out or glass that has been broken. Students and faculty should notify Campus Security of any circumstances that may pose a problem or hazard.

All faculty members engaged in teaching classes at the time of a fire alarm will be responsible for directing classes to leave the building through the nearest available exit. This shall be done on all alarms. Staff members are to immediately leave the building through the nearest available exit and account for all their students. All personnel must familiarize themselves with the location of the nearest fire alarm. It is the responsibility of the Executive Director/Campus Dean* to ensure that all personnel under his/her supervision at the campus are familiar with procedures to be used in case of fire. (Policy D-11, Policies and Procedures Manual).

*Please, consult the Executive Director/Campus Dean's Office for information specific to your campus.

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First Aid

First Aid boxes are provided throughout the campus. In case of an emergency requiring first aid, contact the nearest security officer.

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Student Educational Records and Directory Information

NYIT protects the privacy of educational records and provides students the opportunity to inspect and review their educational and guidelines for the correction of inaccurate or misleading data through informal and formal hearings In essence, the policy provides that all information in central administrative offices, and the registration office concerning a particular student shall be made available to the student upon reasonable notice of desire to review his or her records in accordance with applicable laws, regulations, and policies, and that no one other than duly authorized official may have access to those records without student approval. NYIT designates the following categories of student information as public or directory information and may disclose or release the information without written consent. This does not mean that NYIT will indiscriminately release such information concerning students. Release of such information will be restricted and will be considered on an individual basis by the appropriately designated administrative officer on each campus. Students must inform the college if they do not want this information disclosed by filing a written request at the Admissions and Registration Office not later than three weeks after the student has enrolled in the current term. Information: name; address (including email address); telephone number; dates of attendance; date/place of birth; degrees and awards received; participation in officially recognized activities and sports; major field of study; and most recent previous institution attended.

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Student Rights, Responsibilities, and the Grievance Policy

10.4. STUDENT RIGHTS

Students have the right to:

  • Be informed of course requirements;
  • Be evaluated fairly on the basis of their academic performance (their abilities and skills) as required by a professor as part of a course;
  • Experience free and open discussion, inquiry, and expression, both in the classroom and in conference;
  • Experience competent instruction and advisement.
  • Take exception to the data or views presented and reserve judgment about matters of opinion;
  • Expect protection against a professor's improper disclosure of student's views, beliefs, and political association which may surface as a result of instructing, advising, or counseling;
  • Expect protection, through established procedures; against prejudicial or capricious evaluation (see Academic Integrity Policy, Student Code of Conduct, and Student Grievance Procedures sections).

10.5. STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

Students have the responsibility to:

  • Inquire about course requirements if they do not understand them or are in doubt about them;
  • Maintain the standards of academic performance established for individual courses and for programs of study;
  • Initiate an investigation if they believe their rights have been violated; (see Student Grievance section below);
  • Learn the content of any course of study;
  • Act in accordance with the NYIT standards of academic honesty as spelled out in the NYIT Academic Integrity Policy; and,
  • Act in accordance with the NYIT Code of Conduct.

10.6. STUDENT GRIEVANCE

10.6.1. PREAMBLE

NYIT is committed to providing students with an education of the highest possible quality. However, from time to time, students may raise concerns, complaints or grievances about matters or issues relating to their experiences at NYIT. This document sets out the internal procedures that apply within NYIT for addressing student complaints and grievances. These procedures are designed to ensure that throughout NYIT there is a transparent process for ensuring student complaints and grievances are dealt with fairly, consistently and promptly.

10.6.2. PRINCIPLES

The student grievance resolution procedures of NYIT are based on the following principles:

  1. That the procedures used to review and resolve complaints or grievances are fair and must be seen to be fair;
  2. Confidentiality will be respected for all parties, unless the use of the information is authorized by law;
  3. That staff involved in resolving complaints or grievances will act fairly at all times and ensure that conclusions will be based on a fair hearing of each point of view;
  4. There will be no reprisals or any disadvantage arising as a result of a student making a complaint or grievance in good faith;
  5. That complaints or grievances are handled in a timely manner with achievable deadlines specified for each stage in the resolution process;
  6. Any student who makes a complaint or grievance and any staff member or student on whom the complaint or grievance has a direct impact, is regularly informed of the progress of the matter;

Where the complainant is not satisfied with the outcome proposed by the decision-maker, the student is entitled to seek a review, either on procedural or substantive grounds, from a higher internal body or an appropriate external agency.

10.7. TYPES OF STUDENT GRIEVANCES

10.7.1. ACADEMIC GRIEVANCES

These are usually complaints or appeals against academic decisions. They include but are not limited to:

  • Academic progress decisions
  • Assessment matters such as course grades
  • A decision of a member of academic staff that affects an individual or groups of students
  • Selection or admission decisions
  • Content or structure of academic programs, nature of teaching, or assessment
  • Issues relating to authorship and intellectual property.
10.7.2. ADMINISTRATIVE GRIEVANCES

These relate to decisions and actions associated with administrative or academic services. They include but are not limited to:

  • Administration of policies, procedures and rules by central administrative and student support groups, faculties and departments.
  • A decision by an administrative staff member that affects an individual or groups of students.
  • Access to NYIT resources and facilities.
10.7.3. GROUNDS FOR COMPLAINT OR GRIEVANCE

Without limiting the circumstances which may give rise to a complaint or grievance, a student has valid grounds for making a complaint or grievance or lodging an appeal against a decision made in relation to a complaint or grievance, where the student considers he or she has been adversely affected by one or more of the following:

  • Improper, irregular or negligent conduct by a NYIT staff member.
  • Failure by a NYIT staff member to act fairly.
  • A decision that has been made without sufficient consideration to facts, evidence or circumstances of specific relevance to the student.
  • Failure by NYIT to make a decision within a timely manner.
  • A penalty that, where applied, is or would be too harsh.

10.8. PROCEDURES FOR THE HANDLING AND RESOLUTION OF COMPLAINTS AND GRIEVANCES

This section outlines internal procedures that apply to the handling of academic and administrative complaints and grievances

10.8.1. INFORMAL APPROACH

When a student has a complaint about any of the matters listed, he or she should first discuss the matter with the person concerned. If the student has concerns about raising the matter with this person, then he or she should discuss it with the head of the relevant department or administrative unit or with the chair or of the relevant Faculty. NYIT expects that in most cases the discussion of the concern or complaint with the relevant staff member will result in a prompt resolution of the matter which both parties will find acceptable.

10.8.2. FORMAL APPROACH
  1. When the informal approach to dealing with the student's concerns does not lead to a resolution that is acceptable to the student, the student should commence the formal process for resolution by meeting with the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students and filling out an Incident Report Form.
  2. Based on the student's report, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students discusses the matter with the party targeted in the grievance. If the targeted party consents to an outcome acceptable to the student following a reconsideration of the topic based on a review of NYIT policy or other evidence regarding the matter in question, the grievance is considered resolved and the student is contacted by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students.
  3. If the targeted party rejects the student's evidence or argument as put forth in the Incident Report Form, the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students convenes a hearing of a grievance investigating committee. The investigating committee is chaired by the Director of Student Affairs/Dean of Students and includes a full-time faculty member and a representative of the Student Life Organization. If the grievance is of an academic nature, then the committee also includes the Executive Director/Campus Dean and the Assistant Dean/Supervisor of the relevant program. If the grievance is of an administrative nature, the committee includes the Director of Administration/Director of Operations and External Affairs and the highest-ranking officer from the relevant unit.
  4. The student in question and any party named in the grievance are allowed to present evidence at and bring witnesses to the grievance hearing. Minutes of the meeting will be recorded.
  5. After hearing the evidence, the committee members discuss the evidence in private and write their decision based on a majority vote for distribution to the two parties.
  6. If either party wishes to dispute the decision of the committee, an appeal can be made to the Executive Director/Campus Dean. Based on the minutes of the grievance hearing and any additional evidence that is considered relevant, the Executive Director/Campus Dean makes a final and binding decision on the grievance and conveys this outcome to the parties involved.

10.9. WITHDRAWAL OF COMPLAINTS OR GRIEVANCES

A student may withdraw a complaint or grievance at any time during the grievance resolution process and in this case the matter will be concluded and deemed to be resolved. If the original complaint or grievance was made in writing then the withdrawal must also be in writing to the relevant staff member who is handling the matter at the time the withdrawal is being affected or, in cases before the Assistant Dean, the Executive Director/Campus Dean.

10.10. YOUR TIME AT NYIT

All NYIT employees: management, faculty and staff are available to assist students with any questions that may not be addressed in the student handbook. We hope that you enjoy studying at NYIT and that your development benefits your career and expands your social circle within the global NYIT community.

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NYIT-UAE Addendum

11.1. STUDENT LIFE ORGANIZATION

The Student Life Organization (SLO) is the governing body, student voice, and representative organization of NYIT-UAE students. The SLO is made up of student leaders, acting as representatives from each academic school. The SLO works with the NYIT-UAE administration to discuss and resolve students' issues or concerns, including suggestions on campus quality of life, security, academic operations, parking, food service, and other student concerns. The SLO is also the coordinating and main funding body for campus life programs, events, and activities such as movies, lectures, concerts, parties, educational speakers, student clubs and organizations, student academic affiliations, and other special events.

11.2. STUDENT CLUBS AND ASSOCIATIONS

NYIT does not bar any group of students from discussing their common interests in areas set aside for that purpose (e.g., student lounges, common areas, etc.) at times when those facilities are open and not in use for special events. However, the Student Life Organization (SLO) and the Director of Student Affairs must recognize all clubs and organizations conducting organized activity. Only recognized clubs and organizations may publicize meetings and events on campus, distribute or post club or organization informational materials on NYIT's premises and on NYIT Web sites, request space (e.g., class rooms for meetings, display tables, etc…), and be eligible for modest funding, should campus budget permits.

To be eligible for a university budget, clubs and organizations must complete a registration packet each year and be approved by the SLO, the Director of Student Affairs and the Executive Director/Campus Dean. All recognized student clubs and organizations are expected to abide by all NYIT policies and procedures.

NYIT requires that all student clubs and organizations be recognized by the Student Life Organization (SLO) and Office of Student Affairs by providing the following information:

  1. Recognition Request Form
  2. Organization Registration Form
  3. Membership roster
  4. Constitution
  5. Advisor Consent Form
  6. Budget Request Form (if applicable)
  7. Semester Calendar

11.3. ORGANIZATIONAL ADVISOR

Only full-time administration and faculty of New York Institute of Technology are eligible to serve as advisors, staff may serve as long as the person is approved by the Director of Student Affairs.

An advisor should:

  • Communicate all problems, events, and questions to a student activities administrator in a timely manner;
  • Respond to the Director of Student Affairs' requests, whether if it is to check up on one of your members or to address a concern;
  • Encourage their student groups to contribute to the NYIT community through programming and community service;
  • Act as a responsible representative of your organization and representative of your national organization; and
  • Make sure the members of the organization meet on a regular basis and remain an active, contributing student group to NYIT's community.

Student Publications

NYIT students at global locations, working with faculty advisers, may want to produce a variety of print and electronic publications each year. Students interested in photography, writing, contributing to magazines or producing a yearbook, need to contact the Office of Student Affairs to see how to get involved.

NYIT has policies and guidelines regarding publicity and publications. Posters and publicity for non-NYIT events must be approved and stamped by the Office of the Executive Director/Campus Dean before being posted in the college.

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Dress Code: Non-U.S. Campuses

NYIT-UAE has a dress code in respect for the culture of the UAE community. Students need to be aware that all NYIT-UAE academic and non-academic activities are directed towards helping them prepare to enter the workforce and to be a responsible professional. Students are asked to present themselves at the University in clothing that they would be expected to wear in the UAE work environment. NYIT-UAE asks that students (as well as faculty and staff) wear modest clothing that respects UAE customs and traditions.

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Academic Advising and Tutoring at NYIT-UAE

A student should seek Academic Support from their Faculty Advisor:

  • When on Academic Probation or returning from Academic Suspension;
  • When having difficulties with a course; and need tutoring sessions;
  • When having any physical or learning disabilities;
  • When in need of clarification on policies such as grade appeal, graduation requirements, probation and suspension.

How can a Faculty Advisor help the student?

  • By helping to identify challenges faced and devising a plan to improve the student's GPA;
  • By linking the student to a peer tutor (made available by some schools through their Student Advisory Board) for a course with which the student is having difficulties; In the case of peer-tutoring, upper level students provide academic support and tutoring, counseling and mentoring service to interested students
  • By directing the student to the Director of Student Affairs for tutoring information, advices and/or handouts on improving time-management, study habits, test taking, and other life skills;
  • By coordinating academic accommodations for special needs students to assist them in adapting to university life;
  • By providing accurate information regarding academic requirements as well as clarifying the university's academic policies.

Tutoring

The Director of Student Affairs maintains a list of tutors/peer tutors for use by all members of NYIT-UAE academic community. Student tutors must complete an application; sign the NYIT- UAE Student Tutor Agreement Form; provide a copy of their CV, transcript, and two letters of reference. Faculty members and community tutors provide a copy of their CV. All tutors agree to abide by the NYIT-UAE Tutoring Guidelines.

The university does not endorse nor recommend any of the students or instructors on the list. Specific information regarding tutoring charges (instructors), session length, meeting dates, and locations must be negotiated directly with the tutor.

NYIT-UAE Peer Tutors provide academic support and encouragement for those students who are experiencing academic distress. They assist students with content-related issues and questions; discuss difficult academic concepts and provide novel and creative approaches to understanding them; listen attentively and provide clear explanations of academic problem areas and create a welcoming environment for students in academic distress.

When does a student need a Tutor?

It is important that students recognize some of the warning signs which indicate that the extra help of a tutor may be beneficial. Here are some signs:

  • The student still doesn't understand the subject matter and concepts even though you have met with the instructor during office hours or after class (more than once).
  • The student continues to feel perplexed by the homework and assignments.
  • The student studies and studies, but just doesn't understand.
  • The student continues to get failing grades on assignments and assessments.
  • The student feels behind in class work, and others are ahead.
  • The student feels overwhelmed by the work.